Some of the more popular mass market coffee machines are starting to look a little bit dated (not least the hugely popular and bestselling ESAM4200 by Delonghi), but that couldn’t be further from the truth with the Jura Impressa F8. It’s a very stylish and sophisticated looking machine, that wouldn’t look out of place in an upmarket cafe or bar. Jura have managed to pack a lot of controls in to the unit to give near unparalleled control over coffee making, yet retain a fairly minimalist look. There’s something about a black and silver finish that just looks the part, particularly on kitchen appliances that sit on the worktop – you don’t want something ugly to look at as a permanent fixture in the kitchen!
The digital control panel makes it easy to play with the programmable menu settings, including coffee strength, temperature, auto off and start time. You can also prepare cappuccino and espressos without having to wait between them thanks to the double boiler system that the ESAM5500B features. Lastly, no matter what coffee you plan on using with it, it’s going to be properly ground thanks to the professional quality conical low pitch burr grinder.
I have owned this for about 9 months and gotten nearly 1000 uses out of it (it counts for you). It can equal most coffeehouse product you are likely to find, but as others point out, it is far short of what an enthusiast can create from more traditional equipment. You may also find the crema coffee settings to be something of an acquired taste (but you can make an Americano in just one more step, which is always great).
Whatever you’re into, the Impressa F8 has a coffee for you. While it’s great for the common choices like espresso and americano, it’s just as capable of serving up a macchiato too, or pretty much anything else you can think of. Of course, the more skilled you are as a barista, the more experimental you’ll be able to be, but if you just want something easy, stick with the 13 preset programmes and enjoy what Jura’s experts have created for you in advance.

My first Jura was the F7. I bought it off of Ebay(new) and couldn't have been happier. I was so thrilled with it, that I bought another (F9) and gave my mom the F7 because it was such an awesome machine. It is really remarkable how the machine works. It took me a good 15+ cups to figure out how to make the coffee the way I like it. There are so many options on this machine that effect the taste: Grind, water temp, quantity of beans, quantity of water, etc.... In reference to the service I am amazed. When I received my new F9, I immediately had problems with a couple of the buttons. I called the service center and was on hold for 6-8 minutes. After about a 2 minute conversation with the representative they said that she would just send out a new machine and when I get it to send my old machine back in the box. They paid all postage. No credit card, nothing. I've never heard of such a service before. Absolutely Excellent. I couldn't be happier. It is a great machine that makes very good coffee and looks really nice on the kitchen counter. I love my Jura! As a matter of fact, I believe I am going to go and make myself a decaf latte right down.


The Jura XS90 features easy-to-use controls for setting temperature, volume, and strength of the coffee or espresso dispensed. There’s a large bean hopper with an integrated bean sensor that will remind users to refill the bean container. There’s also a water level sensor that makes sure there’s water in the removable water tank. Priced at around $2,000, this unit is probably the cheapest Jura with a one-touch capability.
The Jura XS90 features easy-to-use controls for setting temperature, volume, and strength of the coffee or espresso dispensed. There’s a large bean hopper with an integrated bean sensor that will remind users to refill the bean container. There’s also a water level sensor that makes sure there’s water in the removable water tank. Priced at around $2,000, this unit is probably the cheapest Jura with a one-touch capability.
Edit - 01/15/2015: Eight and a half years later, this gem is still cranking out great coffee. I had it serviced by the wonderful folks at CoffeeBoss in Cornelius, NC last year, and it's still going strong with a cup count of 9,922. The brew group is not user serviceable, so occasional maintenance should be expected. I use distilled water (at the cost of flavor, I know) now that I'm back in the city on municipal water, so I don't need or use the Clearyl filter (I recommend it for tap/well water, though), and I do use a cleaning tablet within 5-10 cups of when it starts asking for it on the LED display.

As we continue on our journey of Jura Coffee Makers, the Impressa C65 is another “standard” unit. It doesn’t have all of the accouterments of higher-end models, but it still makes an incredible cup of coffee, and it offers the speed and convenience that you would expect from Jura. Overall, we would compare this model to the ENA 9 above, although this one can make two cups at once.
It would be a mistake to say that there’s no learning curve at all on the E8.  It has one; it’s just not particularly steep.  Sure, there are a lot of settings, and a lot of things you can change, tweak and adjust, but honestly, the hardest part of its operation is going to be changing your preferred drink settings and familiarizing yourself with the way the menus work.
While it might seem odd to mention, some people do like to use pre ground coffee with a bean to cup machine, at least occasionally. A common reason is to get a cup of decaffeinated coffee from time to time, without needing to empty out the beans from the hopper, make a drink then switch it all back again. Similarly, if you have a brand of pre-ground coffee that you like as a change from your normal freshly ground beans every so often, the Impressa F8 has you covered.
There's one other area needing fixing, not only in these machines but in all super automatics I've ever tried - tiny puck sizes (diameter) = bad extraction. That's not me saying it. That's Dr. Illy and a wide range of scientific tests that the Illy labs have done finding the optimal puck size for superior extraction. At 46mm, these pucks are too tiny.
The new Gaggia Brera is a very impressive super automatic espresso machine that has a small form factor, making it perfect for use on small kitchen countertops. Not only that, but it seems that the company has focused, among other things, to ensure that the Brera fully maximizes user convenience. For instance, the water tank, drop tray and the dregs drawer are all within reach and can be easily accessed from the machine for simple, swift maintenance and regular cleaning. With this model, beverage selection and machine programming has been greatly simplified, allowing users to easily navigate through the options which are certainly more than you’d expect from such a small machine.
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Aside from the flexibility of using either the supplied gold filter or store-bought paper ones, the Capresso MT600 sports other thoughtful extras. For instance, the right side of the water tower not only features a graduated water indicator which is a staple for these type of products, but its tank fluid gauge boasts a floating red bead that makes it a cinch to see exactly where the water line is in relation to its 10 cup capacity. Frankly, it's a trick I wish other coffee makers employed.
It might seem like a trivial point, but not all machines have thought about this. The Jura’s power cable emerges at the bottom of the rear of the machine, making it very easy to plug it in and neatly arrange any excess cable out of sight. There’s also a ‘master’ power switch in the same location – worth noting as we discovered, having thought the machine was dead on arrival after pressing the power button on top and nothing happening!
The Jura A9 truly shines in the milk drinks department. It features 2 height adjustable spouts that go anywhere from two point two and up to five point four inches if you plan on using taller However, when it comes to the milk, the machine uses a pick-up tube system. What this means is that now you can just place the tube into the milk container and prepare delicious milk based drinks. For better results though, it’s best that you either get Jura’s cool control milk cooler or their optional thermal milk container. That’s because not only is it better to keep milk chilled for sanitary reasons, but chilled milk also produces better froth.

To that end, the MT600 will attempt to keep track of when you last dropped in a fresh charcoal pack. Just press the "filter" button on the control panel, and after six weeks an associated green light will begin blinking. If you unplug the machine, however, all bets are off, as the clock and internal filter replacement timer lose track when power is lost.


...I just bought this machine for my girlfriend's new kitchen. The water sensor in the water tank does not stay in place. Therefore, the machine cannot make coffee because it cannot determine whether or not there is any water in the tank. There is a tiny plastic cap that should hold the sensor in place. The cap doesn't clip in, and floats away as soon as the tank is filled. Therefore the entire machine doesn't work.
This Jura Impressa F8 review is the first we’ve added to the site from the Swiss manufacturer. The first thing you notice is its classy appearance, in the ‘Piano Black’ colour scheme that’s going to make it look the part in any kitchen. As you read the review, it will become clear why the Impressa F8 has quickly taken the number three spot in our top ten models.
Capresso is actually an amalgamation of the words “cappuccino” and “espresso.” Jura Capresso is known as an innovator, coming up with a lot of firsts. It is the first company to have a programmable coffeemaker/conical burr grinder combination. It also came up with the first automatic drip coffee maker with a stainless steel thermal carafe. The first burr grinder with electronic sensor was also introduced by the company. Other innovations include the first semi-automatic espresso machine, first burr grinder for home use, and first stand-alone automatic milk frother for consumer use.
Edit - 01/15/2015: Eight and a half years later, this gem is still cranking out great coffee. I had it serviced by the wonderful folks at CoffeeBoss in Cornelius, NC last year, and it's still going strong with a cup count of 9,922. The brew group is not user serviceable, so occasional maintenance should be expected. I use distilled water (at the cost of flavor, I know) now that I'm back in the city on municipal water, so I don't need or use the Clearyl filter (I recommend it for tap/well water, though), and I do use a cleaning tablet within 5-10 cups of when it starts asking for it on the LED display.
In addition, the Capresso website offers plenty of data for using this espresso machine. Among other things, it provides a downloadable user manual along with PDF files containing a variety of delicious hot milk frothing recipes so you can prepare such things as different types of teas, soothing milk drinks and several different types of hot chocolate drinks.
Jura has several coffee machines on the market at several different price points so if you were planning on investing in one (and they are an investment), we’d like to help you make sense of the different features and make clear what you gain and lose as you look at different models while deciding which one is the best fit for your kitchen. In this thorough Jura review guide, we are going to cover what makes the Jura so special and ultimately worth the money, what the best features of each unit are, what to look out for when deciding on a model, and most importantly which Jura coffee machine to buy.
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