My wife LOVES coffee...I like coffee...she works ..I work...we have three kids...I would try to stay in bed longer than her to keep from having to make the coffee in the morning.. For Christmas I bought an Impressa F7 ..I was only prepared to spend about $1000 on a coffee machine at Williams-Sonoma...but the machine I could get for that really lacked some basic features...there were more expensive machines...but the F7 seemed to have most of what I wanted ...I got up Christmas morning to set up the machine, which was relatively easy...(although after 7 or 8 cups of "tweeking" the machine, my heart was pounding up in my throat and when the kids came down to see what Santa had left them I sent them back upstairs for making too much noise)...The coffee was REALLY good...it took a while to learn how to adjust the machine to get what we each liked, but now we love the machine...although there are occassional issues such as a luke warm cup now and then and the frother is marginal...it has made our life in the morning a very pleasant experience...it really doesn't require much upkeep ....wouldn't give it up now...
Jura does not make any budget-friendly machines, so you should come in expecting to make an investment. Prices range from $800 for a single cup machine, to above $5,000 for Jura’s top of the line model. You can always search for refurbished models, and Jura occasionally offers factory serviced machines that function like new, but have been returned to the company for unspecified reasons. 

One of the things that makes Jura such a world-renown coffee company is that their machines are so easy to use. As long as you have beans, water, and milk in the container, all you have to do is push a button and wait for the perfect cup to arrive. In this case, the Impressa F8 is one of the more technologically proficient models, thanks to its TFT screen.

For those who tend to like their java a bit more robust and flavorful, this espresso machine offers a coffee and steam wand that you can use to adjust the potency of your coffee. If you prefer a bit less vigor to your morning espresso, simply move the wand to the steam side to add a bit more water. This will allow you to share your espresso maker with those around you who prefer a stronger or milder taste you do and still keep everyone happy.
When prompted by the machine that it’s time to clean, find the “clean” option under the various cleaning programs and be prepared to follow the instructions it gives you. This is usually as quick as emptying the grounds tray and pressing the rotary dial one more time. Please a cup or jug under the spout to capture the cleaning waste that will be dispelled from the machine. You will hear the machine perform an initial rinse, and then prompt you to add the cleaning tablet which will be inserted into the pre-ground coffee compartment. After another push of the rotary button, the machine will go through an approximately 20 minute cycle so you’ll want to do it when you have a bit of time.

The other thing to keep in mind is that the milk frother can be a little finicky. We discussed the fact that most frothers don’t (or can’t) heat the milk to the same level as the coffee, and this machine is no different. Also, cleaning the spout can be a little tricky. Overall, when buying the E6, just plan on spending some time to get to know it. Once you’ve mastered all of the little things, it will become second nature.
The Saeco PicoBaristo HD8924/47 Super-automatic espresso machine is a superior compact coffee machine from one of the world’s best-known manufacturers. It is an Amazon Choice machine, popular with purchasers and the recipient of excellent reviews. The PicoBaristo provides the widest variety of drinks of any compact super-automatic espresso machine.
When you think of other “one-touch” coffee solutions on the market, what typically comes to mind are single serve coffee machines that utilize K-cups or some other kind of coffee pod. While these definitely changed the game when first introduced, they leave a lot to be desired in terms of waste and the Jura has evolved past them. K-cups and coffee pods produce an extreme amount of plastic, cardboard and foil that is filling up landfills as at a rapid pace. Not to mention, by the time the coffee gets to your machine, the grounds have been sitting on the shelf for months and are most likely very stale.
I love this machine. I also have a krupps super automatic as well and I prefer this one. One complaint though is that the spout height is slightly low and so I cannot fit certain mugs in there. Not a deal breaker but it is an inconvenience. The thing I like about the jura is the ability to bypass the whole bean grinder and use preground coffee. Since with any super automatic, you need to be very careful about the oiliness of the bean, this is a great feature when you still want flavored coffee. The interface isn't very difficult to learn and it is quite the beauty sitting on the counter.

Also, we went through a brief episode in which it would refuse to brew anything (as if it didn't have the power to punch the water through the puck of coffee). I remedied this with a descaling cycle as well as wiping out the parts above the removable tray thoroughly. (I use filtered water in the machine, but the descaling seems to be a more serious cleaning than the normal automatic cleaning.)


Aside from the display, another feature of the Jura Impressa F8 that is worth mentioning is the Expert Mode. As the name suggests, this feature is ideal for coffee connoisseurs as it allows changing or adjusting the settings for all drinks programmed on the machine. It also gives users the option of adjusting the volume of the shot once it starts to brew.

The Micro 1 in many ways is the Micro 9’s little brother. This simple, ultra compact Jura machine features a sleek black design that is both minimal and modern. With the Micro 1, Jura set out to make their smallest unit without sacrificing the power and quality they are known for. And after out tests with a demo unit, we can safely say that they succeeded.


If you’re a froth fan, you won’t be disappointed – Jura machines tend to be very good frothers (if that’s a word) and manage to top off drinks to the same standard as you’ll usually find in the high street coffee shops. It’s certainly an impressive result, even if we found it was a novelty the wore off rather quickly. We’re not the biggest advocates of milk foaming though, so you might be more excited that we are!
Jura is a premium brand that specialises in automatic coffee machines. With the majority of their models costing over £1000 - and some as much as £3700 - their target market is coffee enthusiasts who are willing to pay more for the best coffee. On this page, we'll go through some of the best Jura bean-to-cup coffee machines, along with reviews of why we think they are excellent models.

Save a lot of money – If you calculate how much money you are spending on a monthly basis on regular visits to coffee shops, the amount would be very high. Also, this may or may not increase every month. You can make a variety of coffee drinks at home with just one espresso machine. Buying Jura coffee machine is a one-time investment. It will help you save a lot of money in coffee shops.  


09/16/2010 - The C1000 finally gave out after 10+ years and service fees of $250. With all lights now flashing and the loudest grinding noise ever, it was confirmed today with Jura-Capresso Customer Service that this unit is not worth their new $250 service fee to repair (if it could be repaired). I still found the C1000 a great appliance and Jura-Capresso a very reputable company. From a cost-analysis perspective (and these are ONLY estimates), I consume about 700 cups per year which requires about 20 pounds of beans at $10 per pound (Fresh Market) or $200 per year. Ten years worth of coffee beans cost about $2,000. Add the $900 cost of the C1000, plus two $125 service fees, my total investment was around $3,150. I excluded the cost of water since we pay a minimal fee, but never use the charged amount. Equivalent cups of pressure brewed coffee (about $3 per cup from Starbucks) over this ten year period would cost about $21,000. I compare Starbucks prices since there is a huge quality difference between their pressure-brewed coffee and drip coffee at your local food mart. So my break-even point with the Jura-Capresso C1000 was between one and two years. The remaining eight to nine years of coffee I consumed was at no cost (when compared to Starbucks). This analysis only includes the direct financial cost and not the cost of your time/fuel getting to Starbucks. I happily accepted Jura-Capresso’s "one-time replacement offer" to upgrade my C1000 to a new IMPRESSA C5. The list price is $999, but the upgrade cost is only $600. Although my C1000 unit has experienced problems, it continues to be the most awesome coffee machine ever! Once my IMPRESSA C5 machine arrives and has been used a short time, I will post a new product review.Read full review...
...I just bought this machine for my girlfriend's new kitchen. The water sensor in the water tank does not stay in place. Therefore, the machine cannot make coffee because it cannot determine whether or not there is any water in the tank. There is a tiny plastic cap that should hold the sensor in place. The cap doesn't clip in, and floats away as soon as the tank is filled. Therefore the entire machine doesn't work.
There are many ways to make a single coffee drink and preferences will naturally vary. With the Jura coffee machine, there are tons of opportunities to customize the details and fine-tune your daily coffee experience. If there is something you don’t like or want prepared differently, you can reprogram the ratios for certain beverages to match your personal tastes. For example, if you like you macchiato with slightly less milk (I know I do), you can adjust the ratio so there is a bit more coffee than the factory setting serves. If you like your coffee extra hot, that setting can be adjusted globally on the Jura as well. Don’t worry though, anything you customize can be reversed for a one off coffee drink in case you want to make something for a guest and they don’t necessarily share you tastes in coffee. We love that Jura understands everyone has slightly difference tastes and makes adjusting the settings of the machine easy to do.
With many of the Jura models available in our review guide, you will be able to control the unit with a large, stunning visual screen that is controlled by buttons on the side and a rotary dial on the top of the unit. With the buttons on the side of the screen, you select a class of coffee beverage such as espresso or plain coffee. After you decide your class of drink, you can literally turn the dial and watch the different drink selections go by until you find one that suits your mood. The interface is finely tuned and at no point does it feel cumbersome or stand in your way. The Jura is an extension of your coffee desires and the only thing standing between you and your perfect drink is the press of a button. For the models that don’t feature the visual display, there is an equally easy to use and ergonomically arranged display of buttons. The three green, yellow, and red lights, coupled with the rotary knob delivery your desired beverage just as quickly and with zero confusion as to how to select it.
Instead of an LCD screen, this model uses a standard LED to show you what kind of coffee you’re making. It’s not quite as involved, but it’s helpful and better than a manual version. With the ENA 9, you can make six different kinds of coffee. It uses two nozzles to layer your beverages perfectly with foam or milk. The frother is a separate unit that connects to the base machine.
1) After much research, I purchased the F9 at Williams Sonoma, primarily because they used to have a policy that you could return anything, at any time, if needed. So, I figured that if ever I had an issue, I could just return it to my local Williams Sonoma and get a replacement rather than returning the machine to the factory and waiting. Turns out I did indeed have to do this once for an electrical issue, which was actually an issue I had with the wiring at the outlet--not the machine afterall! In any event, I don't think Williams Sonoma still has that same open-ended return policy. Be sure to research the return policy wherever you make your purchase!
The Wrap-up: While someone with simple tastes may be content with a twenty dollar automatic drip coffee maker or instant powders, real coffee lovers will appreciate the finer points of the Jura-Capresso S8. Not only will this superb machine turn out brews worthy of elegant European cafes, but it does so with a surprisingly little effort from the user, thanks to its simple “one-touch” programming.

Setup is way easier than the manual would have you believe - the pathetic printed booklet is by far the weakest link in this coffee production line. Fitting the water filter and the Smart Connect dongle is not explained well at all. You’ll find answers to most of your questions online - but probably not on JURA’s website. Unofficial YouTube videos proved much more useful.
To that end, the MT600 will attempt to keep track of when you last dropped in a fresh charcoal pack. Just press the "filter" button on the control panel, and after six weeks an associated green light will begin blinking. If you unplug the machine, however, all bets are off, as the clock and internal filter replacement timer lose track when power is lost.
3) This machine is crazy smart. It knows exactly when to clean itself, or tells you when to start the cleaning cycle. To clean it, all you do is insert a tablet in the coffee powder drawer and it does its thing. It knows when it needs water, when the filter needs to be changed, etc. In fact, since we have a water filter built into our refrigerator, we just use that filtered water in the coffee machine and therefore we don't need to use the expensive water filters. Bottom line, if you just pay attention and clean the machine on a regular basis when it tells you to, this is a no-brainer machine.
×