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After much research and agonizing indecesion, I finally purchased the Jura J9 Super Automatic coffee machine. Our DeLonghi lasted several years, then died a noisy death. We had enjoyed it, but I felt like there were better machines to be had, so I focused on Jura and Saeco. I decided I wanted a Jura because of the easier cleaning, as reported by some reviewers, as well as great flavor and crema in the coffee. Then picking the model became hard. Not a lot of info on the Jura website as to how the different models work, but I finally decided that I liked the price range and capabilities of the J models. Costco had a J80 to sell, as well as a F7. I love the confidence I can have when buying from Costco, and that would have been a big plus for me. The J80 had been on sale for $400 off a few days before our DeLonghi failed, so I missed the sale and I couldn't bring myself to pay their full price of $2400 for a model that was not listed on the Jura website and some people suggested was an older model. I even emailed Costco, hoping they might honor the sale price, but no go. I finally found a J9 on Amazon for $2000, and read reviews where purchasers reassured me that, if something went wrong, I could feel secure in knowing that Amazon and its sellers would take good care of me and fix or replace the machine fairly quickly. I couldn't tell from the description if this was a J9 or J9.3, but decided it didn't matter. The model I received was the J9.3. It came quickly and the box was in great shape.
And it bears out in the coffee the machine produces: our very first cup was a delicious and gloriously smooth latte with barely a hint of bitterness. The milk steaming wand is excellent too, producing much lighter, airier foam than the (admittedly way, way cheaper) Morphy Richards’ model, and there’s also a hot water spout for those who want to make an Americano by topping up their espresso.
Of course, this is not all and you get a wide range of other impressive functions, such as ceramic valve technology, pre-ground option for decaf, 1-touch cappuccino system, large bean hopper with sensor and adjustable height brew spouts. Therefore, if you’re looking for the ultimate in espresso machines, then you certainly need to consider the Jura XS90 and experience how the perfect espresso shot actually tastes like.
First of all, the TFT display will notify you when you are running low on anything (which the F8 lacks), and it will tell you when it needs cleaning. Having this kind of automatic reminders ensures that you can extend the lifespan of your machine. The other thing that we like about the E6 better than the F8 is the grinder. The G3 grinder system is a significant improvement.
Like the best espresso machines found in restaurants and cafes, the Capresso EC100 uses bar pressure to extract the greatest flavor out of coffee grounds. You can use finely ground coffee, or for greater convenience on a busy morning, you can make use of the pre-packaged espresso coffee pods. You can brew two cups of espresso at the same time, and you can get your cups toasty warm to keep your beverage hot longer by placing them on the stainless steel cup-warming tray on top.
Our final Jura Coffee Maker is technically classified as an espresso maker. As such, it’s only designed for espressos, although you can experiment to make different kinds of beverages if you want. As an espresso machine, this unit is really impressive. If you have used other similar models, you will be impressed by the quality and convenience that the Ena Micro 1 offers.

We will be taking a look at nine of the different model lines of Jura’s Super Fully Automatic coffee machines. They also offer a professional level line of machines, if you’re interested, but we will be reviewing the full line of Jura’s home espresso-machines. The machines are generally classified in accordance with their features and functionality, as well as their size and general purpose.

Jura has several coffee machines on the market at several different price points so if you were planning on investing in one (and they are an investment), we’d like to help you make sense of the different features and make clear what you gain and lose as you look at different models while deciding which one is the best fit for your kitchen. In this thorough Jura review guide, we are going to cover what makes the Jura so special and ultimately worth the money, what the best features of each unit are, what to look out for when deciding on a model, and most importantly which Jura coffee machine to buy.
A recent addition to Jura’s impressive line of coffee machines is the Impressa F8 which incorporates the best features from some of the new and older units of Jura. This Jura coffee machine is the first compact machine with a full color TFT LCD display. The 2.8 inch LCD display makes it a lot easier for users to understand what their machine is doing.
From the outside, the Giga 5 looks attractive. It has a color TFT (thin film transistor) LCD screen display on the top front and center, with a stylish aluminum chassis with black plastic sides. This unit will definitely enhance the look of any kitchen. There’s a dedicated hot water spout at the front of the machine plus a couple of adjustable spouts for making coffee. Located on top of the unit you will find on/off buttons, a program button, and a rotary switch that is key to navigating the Giga’s menu. 
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