Although the low RPM motor is a fantastic feature of this Capresso grinder, it may struggle with darker, oilier beans on the finest grind settings. The mechanical timer is also not as precise as one would wish, as the machine begins grinding the moment you turn the dial. As a result, grind quantities are fairly inconsistent. Another notable disadvantage is the fact that the 565’s bean hopper is not entirely airtight, making it unsuitable for storing coffee beans for more than a few days at a time. Finally, due to the design of its grind chute and a recurring problem with static cling, this grinder can get fairly messy.

The Aroma G3 grinder uses conical steel burrs and six degrees of fineness to grind quickly, thanks to the perfected cutting angles that produce 60% less residual grounds. The result is a quieter grinder that preserves more of the flavor and aroma of the freshly ground beans while operating twice as fast. An integrated bypass doser allows for pre-ground coffee brewing.
Jura offers the ultimate in luxury coffee machines. Designed for those with discerning tastes, this well-known brand offers some of the best coffee makers you can buy – period. From single-serve machines to top-of-the-line super automatic espresso makers, Jura does it all. For the home-brewing enthusiasts, the following three models are the best-of-the-best.

The Z9 also has a number of advanced features. These include a wireless connection, which can interact with the Jura Cool Control system to warn you when the milk level is low, and integrated cleaning programmes that mean you don't need to manually clean the brewing unit. The milk frother can automatically make creamy milk for cappuccino and lattes.


The other point that we wanted to highlight isn’t necessarily a negative per se, but just the fact that it’s a lot to spend, and let’s face it – it is! There’s a lot of machines available in the sub £500 range, and we’d never advocate or encourage spending more than you can afford. Having said that, you do get what you pay for, and in this case we believe it’s exceptional quality. If you really love coffee, it’s probably worth paying as much as you’re comfortable with to get a great machine, and that’s exactly what you’re getting here.
Also, we went through a brief episode in which it would refuse to brew anything (as if it didn't have the power to punch the water through the puck of coffee). I remedied this with a descaling cycle as well as wiping out the parts above the removable tray thoroughly. (I use filtered water in the machine, but the descaling seems to be a more serious cleaning than the normal automatic cleaning.)
Operation is dead simple with the three-button interface on the top of the machine where you select from thee user-defined cup sizes (espresso, lingo and ristretto) and two aroma levels. The special aroma preservation technology does a great job of keeping the beans fresh and the Aroma Plus grinder precisely grinds them to a consistent size every time. The intelligent pre-heating feature is going to ensure that the coffee is always hot and topped with a light and airy crema.

I only have one minor quibble with this machine; if you like cappuccino, it produces foam that is weak and deflates easily. I have troubleshot this problem from every possible angle (tried different percent milkfat, different milks(soy), different milk temps etc.) and the results were still a little disappointing. I purchased the Milk Frothing accessory designed for this unit and still could not produce the more velvety foam I was seeking. The easiest fix for this is to buy an Aerolatte: steam your milk with the F9 (the steam function works great) and then whip till your hearts content with the Aerolatte. For an extra $15 bucks spent on the Aerolatte, you'll have the perfect cup of cappuccino to rival any cafe.
Let’s take making a cappuccino with the Jura, for example. Instead of having to froth your milk manually, the Jura will froth the milk for you and layer it into your cappuccino perfectly. Forget having to clean a separate canister and frother; it’s all done for you right within the machine. The Jura can even tackle more complicated drinks such as a latte macchiato. The Jura will lay down a layer of foam on the bottom of your cup, add coffee, and finish it off with a perfect layer of foam on top creating a truly authentic latte macchiato.
Have used a SAECO machine for the last ten years.Finally "blew up" and I needed a replacement. Have known the Jura machines for a long time but because of the price never considered purchasing one. Finally had the courage to purchase the Jura J9 and have absolutely no regrets. Makes excellent Espresso or a coffee with a crema. Cappuccinos or Latte Macchiatos are a breeze to make. Wish I would have purchased earlier.
For most users looking into bringing home a Jura, the basics of what to look for are a little fuzzy. There isn’t as much general information on Jura espresso machines, but we’ve compiled our favorite key points to keep in mind for your search. Juras can add a professional quality espresso and sophisticated edge to your day, but they also need to be able to fit within the demands of your lifestyle and environment.
The Jura XS90 features easy-to-use controls for setting temperature, volume, and strength of the coffee or espresso dispensed. There’s a large bean hopper with an integrated bean sensor that will remind users to refill the bean container. There’s also a water level sensor that makes sure there’s water in the removable water tank. Priced at around $2,000, this unit is probably the cheapest Jura with a one-touch capability.
Jura bean to cup coffee machines form a premium range that will appeal to readers with a higher budget level. With some machines moving up into the four figure range, they offer a high quality coffee to match that higher price tag. Many coffee lovers swear by the brand, as you would expect from a company that focuses on delivering high quality products.
The height of the cappuccino spout for latte macchiato and cappuccino and the coffee spout is continuously adjustable, the creation of perfect specialty drinks both in a small espresso cup and in a latte macchiato glass up to 6 inches tall. The integrated fine foam technology from JURA ensures unique milk foam quality with a fine, feather-light consistency.
It’s affordable (£70 at Argos at the time of writing; Dolce Gusto pods are priced at around £4 for a box of 16) and incredibly simple to set up and use. Simply fill the removable water tank with cold H2O, pop your chosen coffee pod into a slide-out drawer at the front, stick a cup under the spout and hit the power button. When it turns from red to green (a mere few seconds) the machine is ready. You then push the water lever either left (for cold drinks) or right (for hot drinks) until the desired amount of your drink is in the cup. Then slide out the drawer, expel the pod and throw it away.
This super-automatic Jura Capresso ENA 5 coffee machine does produce a tasty cup of coffee, no doubt about it. But we are concerned about its ability to hold up under pressure (literally, with flying milk nozzles!). For the kind of cash that this machine requires, most customers would likely be happier with another Jura model (the S9, perhaps) or another brand of super-automatic coffee machine.
Jura were new for our 2017 updates on the site, and we fully expect them to feature highly in our top ten table for 2018, alongside the likes of the Melitta Caffeo Barista TS. With our early reviews, we put the majority of effort into the big names and big sellers, like the Delonghi Magnifica ESAM4200 that’s always near the top of the bestseller list on Amazon. Now that we’ve fairly comprehensively covered those, our attention is shifting towards the premium models that may not sell as many, but will really attract people that know their coffee, and Jura fit that description perfectly.

The very first espresso machines worked on a steam-pressure basis, and they’re still in use today. With this type of machine, steam or steam pressure is used to force water through the coffee grounds and produce espresso. Some steam-driven machines can produce a measure of foam “crema.” But they can’t generate enough pressure or provide the precise temperature control necessary to produce true espresso: They simply make a very strong cup of coffee. However, they cost considerably less than pump-driven machines. Our verdict is that if you’re a true espresso lover and seeking to make a good shot at home, we recommend you steer clear of steam-driven machines. They’ll likely disappoint you.

This hefty Capresso burr grinder is built with a heavy-duty zinc die-cast housing, making it sturdy and reliable. Its large 8-ounce hopper ensures that you won’t be refilling your coffee beans for days. Its burr grinding mechanism produces consistent, uniform grinds in 16 different texture settings, from Turkish at the finest to French press at the coarsest. Because the Capresso 565 has a low RPM, low-heat grinder design, it causes minimal degradation to your coffee beans. 
If you’re a froth fan, you won’t be disappointed – Jura machines tend to be very good frothers (if that’s a word) and manage to top off drinks to the same standard as you’ll usually find in the high street coffee shops. It’s certainly an impressive result, even if we found it was a novelty the wore off rather quickly. We’re not the biggest advocates of milk foaming though, so you might be more excited that we are!
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