I had avoided automatics for a while simply because pulling a shot seemed like such a romantic notion. Hah! Switching to a schedule that kicks off at 5:45 AM makes anything 'automatic' look a whole lot sexier. I am setting aside $$$ so that when this one finally fails (and that should be a while - this machine demonstrates superior engineering), I can dart right to the store and buy another.
To that end, the MT600 will attempt to keep track of when you last dropped in a fresh charcoal pack. Just press the "filter" button on the control panel, and after six weeks an associated green light will begin blinking. If you unplug the machine, however, all bets are off, as the clock and internal filter replacement timer lose track when power is lost.
When the milk is finally steamed on the dual element system, the machine is ready to continue making more espresso shots. Keep in mind that if you choose to get a single element machine, you’ll need to wait five minutes so that the boiler can cool off naturally and then run hot water through the steam wand for ten seconds in order to purge the boiler of steam.
09/16/2010 - The C1000 finally gave out after 10+ years and service fees of $250. With all lights now flashing and the loudest grinding noise ever, it was confirmed today with Jura-Capresso Customer Service that this unit is not worth their new $250 service fee to repair (if it could be repaired). I still found the C1000 a great appliance and Jura-Capresso a very reputable company. From a cost-analysis perspective (and these are ONLY estimates), I consume about 700 cups per year which requires about 20 pounds of beans at $10 per pound (Fresh Market) or $200 per year. Ten years worth of coffee beans cost about $2,000. Add the $900 cost of the C1000, plus two $125 service fees, my total investment was around $3,150. I excluded the cost of water since we pay a minimal fee, but never use the charged amount. Equivalent cups of pressure brewed coffee (about $3 per cup from Starbucks) over this ten year period would cost about $21,000. I compare Starbucks prices since there is a huge quality difference between their pressure-brewed coffee and drip coffee at your local food mart. So my break-even point with the Jura-Capresso C1000 was between one and two years. The remaining eight to nine years of coffee I consumed was at no cost (when compared to Starbucks). This analysis only includes the direct financial cost and not the cost of your time/fuel getting to Starbucks. I happily accepted Jura-Capresso’s "one-time replacement offer" to upgrade my C1000 to a new IMPRESSA C5. The list price is $999, but the upgrade cost is only $600. Although my C1000 unit has experienced problems, it continues to be the most awesome coffee machine ever! Once my IMPRESSA C5 machine arrives and has been used a short time, I will post a new product review.Read full review...

You don’t really need to be a coffee connoisseur to be able to prepare your own drinks with this coffee machine. There are recipes for 12 coffee creations which you can select with the rotary switch. The machine uses images and texts to guide users through the preparation stages. You can prepare coffee choices such as Irish coffee, flavored latte macchiato, Viennese coffee, and Café Melange, amongst others. In addition, this coffee machine is also self cleaning to eliminate any excuses when it comes to making speciality coffee at home.
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