I have had several super automatic coffee machines in the past 10 years. My wife and I are coffee lovers and our favorite time every day is sitting down together when I get home from work and talking over a cup of our favorite coffee. It was our quest, after we were married, to find the perfect way to brew coffee. it couldn't be the french press. We travel with one since most upscale hotels don't have a coffee maker in the room, but at home we want a perfect cup each time and every time! Our journey started with Saeco and I am not hear to bash their products! I've had 5 Saecos and still own 3. One is our backup. One we use when we entertain and need more than one machine and the third is broken. The broken one was our favorite and newest. I cleaned it one day and when I was reinserting the brew group a little piece of plastic broke and poof, there goes the machine. Of course I'll get it fixed, but this is the type of stuff we have always encountered with Saeco! Great machine...cheaply built. I decided that I was upgrading and trying a different brand. After a tremendous amount of research I settled on the Jura F7 refurbished. An almost $2,000 machine for $699 and a warranty. I couldn't see a risk and have had great luck with buying refurbished items. Let me tell you from the moment it arrived it has been the easiest to use machine we've ever owned! Again, I loved our Saeco's, but they are nothing in comparison to the Jura!!! The speed in which it grinds, tamps, brews and cleans is literally 60 seconds. It is so much quieter than Saeco and cleaning does not involve the removal of anything. Open a lid...drop in a cleaning tab...put a large cup under the spout and BAM...it's cleaning. 15 minutes later my machine said "READY"! I pressed a button and out came another perfectly brewed cup of my favorite coffee from a little plantation in Hawaii!

I only have one minor quibble with this machine; if you like cappuccino, it produces foam that is weak and deflates easily. I have troubleshot this problem from every possible angle (tried different percent milkfat, different milks(soy), different milk temps etc.) and the results were still a little disappointing. I purchased the Milk Frothing accessory designed for this unit and still could not produce the more velvety foam I was seeking. The easiest fix for this is to buy an Aerolatte: steam your milk with the F9 (the steam function works great) and then whip till your hearts content with the Aerolatte. For an extra $15 bucks spent on the Aerolatte, you'll have the perfect cup of cappuccino to rival any cafe.
It’s a lovely looking, all-metal thing, with even accessories like the tamper and milk jug exuding an air of quiet, understated luxury. The portafilter is reassuringly weighty and solid, locking into the group head with a satisfying twist. There are clever little touches you can’t see or immediately feel that add to the feeling of quality too: on top is a tray that warms your cups, and the 2l water tank has an integrated, changeable filter.
With the look of a shrink-rayed professional espresso machine, the grinning fizzog of shaven-headed culinary chemist Heston Blumenthal on the box and a price tag that puts it out of reach of all but the most well-heeled caffeine fiend, the Barista Express (branded as Breville in the US and Sage in the UK) is clearly aimed at those seeking a major step up in their home-brewed coffee.
Better yet, you can also customize the volume, strength and also coffee aroma in order to ensure that you prepare the ideal drink you and your friends are going to love. Other than that, the grinder uses Gaggia’s Adapting System for adjusting the RPMs which helps dispense the right amount of coffee grounds, while the wide range of coffee drinks you can make with the Brera qualify it as the best and most affordable super automatic espresso machine for coffee lovers on a budget.
It would be a mistake to say that there’s no learning curve at all on the E8.  It has one; it’s just not particularly steep.  Sure, there are a lot of settings, and a lot of things you can change, tweak and adjust, but honestly, the hardest part of its operation is going to be changing your preferred drink settings and familiarizing yourself with the way the menus work.

Edit - 01/15/2015: Eight and a half years later, this gem is still cranking out great coffee. I had it serviced by the wonderful folks at CoffeeBoss in Cornelius, NC last year, and it's still going strong with a cup count of 9,922. The brew group is not user serviceable, so occasional maintenance should be expected. I use distilled water (at the cost of flavor, I know) now that I'm back in the city on municipal water, so I don't need or use the Clearyl filter (I recommend it for tap/well water, though), and I do use a cleaning tablet within 5-10 cups of when it starts asking for it on the LED display.

The IMPRESSA J9 is probably the most popular model after the newer Micro 9 due to its breadth of features and overall precision when brewing and crafting a litany of specialty coffee drinks. The concept behind the J9 could not be simpler: simply use the rotary dial to select your desired drink, press the button, and sit back and enjoy. This model is absolutely beautiful and looks like it was pulled right out of an Italian café. The matte sheen and silver hard plastic give the J9 and functional sophistication that will definitely impress you.
With the Impressa C9, you get programmed beverage buttons for espresso, cappuccino, coffee, hot water or milk. A 14oz. milk container is included and a burr grinder is built-into the machine. The 64-ounce removable water tank is easy to clean, and the ThermoBlock heating system keeps water at the optimal temperature. With an 18-bar power pump, this machine brews fantastic espresso.
Now that great espresso shots aren't hard to find, this machine is more about convenience and reliability than knock-your-socks-off espresso. But it does make great coffee - better than any Mr. Coffee or even Keurig. I keep Dark Roast Guatemalan Viennese in the bean hopper, pull two one-ounce shots, lengthen them with hot water, and I'm drinking awesome coffee before my neighbor has finished peeling the foil on his can of Maxwell House. And since I'm just buying good old whole beans, it's much cheaper to use than a Keurig.
The design of the Giga 5 is beautiful, and the clean lines running up and across the unit make it modern and sophisticated. Due to the fact that the Giga 5 has two grinders, pumps and heating systems, it produces a good amount of internal heat. Jura solves this problem by automatically diverting the heat and steam away from the machine via the visually appealing “venti ports,” which in turn provide fresh air into the system.
The design of the Giga 5 is beautiful, and the clean lines running up and across the unit make it modern and sophisticated. Due to the fact that the Giga 5 has two grinders, pumps and heating systems, it produces a good amount of internal heat. Jura solves this problem by automatically diverting the heat and steam away from the machine via the visually appealing “venti ports,” which in turn provide fresh air into the system.
 The DeLonghi ECAM22110SB’s Rapid Cappuccino System allows you to make cappuccinos one after another quickly with no wait-time in between, making it excellent for hosting parties or large get-togethers. A rotary control system and simple user interface allow even beginners to create cafe-quality drinks at the touch of a button. Like many of DeLonghi’s most popular coffee systems, this machine is compact enough for use on smaller counter spaces.
From the outside, the Giga 5 looks attractive. It has a color TFT (thin film transistor) LCD screen display on the top front and center, with a stylish aluminum chassis with black plastic sides. This unit will definitely enhance the look of any kitchen. There’s a dedicated hot water spout at the front of the machine plus a couple of adjustable spouts for making coffee. Located on top of the unit you will find on/off buttons, a program button, and a rotary switch that is key to navigating the Giga’s menu.
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