Working upstairs or lying in bed? Press the button and (depending on how palatial your abode is) you’ll instantly hear beans being ground into tasty oblivion before the water is heated and poured through them. Then, when you’re ready (the hot plate gives you a 40-minute window), you can brave the trek to the kitchen and find a jug of the delicious black stuff waiting for you.
One of the essential selling points of this coffee maker is that it comes with two grinders. This allows you to mix and match between different beans, such as if you want to have regular or decaf as an option. The grinders themselves are also better than anything else that Jura offers. Instead of metal, they are ceramic, which not only means that they last longer, but they are much quieter.
This is made to order coffee, not the stuff sitting in the pot for hours on end. You might argue that the coffee shops grind their own coffee. And they do, but not for every cup (otherwise a $4 cup would be history for sure) and this is the main point. Their ground coffee is still sitting around exposed to air and going stale. The stuff in their pot or thermal tank just sits until empty.
There are other factors to consider, such as color and material, but most Jura machines come with customizable aesthetics. We will cover more in-depth things to know in the next couple of sections, but for now, hold on to this list of general thoughts as we begin to browse the different Jura lines and examine what each different type of machine has to offer.

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The very first espresso machines worked on a steam-pressure basis, and they’re still in use today. With this type of machine, steam or steam pressure is used to force water through the coffee grounds and produce espresso. Some steam-driven machines can produce a measure of foam “crema.” But they can’t generate enough pressure or provide the precise temperature control necessary to produce true espresso: They simply make a very strong cup of coffee. However, they cost considerably less than pump-driven machines. Our verdict is that if you’re a true espresso lover and seeking to make a good shot at home, we recommend you steer clear of steam-driven machines. They’ll likely disappoint you.
The IPBAS system is a special 2 step pre infusion cycle that conditions and also moistens the ground coffee to get the best flavor extraction with excellent crema topping. Thanks to the great functionality of the F50, you can brew from 1 to 16 oz cups of coffee in 5 different strength settings. It can also grind from five to max sixteen g of coffee, ranging in strength from extra mild to extra strong.
Edit - 01/15/2015: Eight and a half years later, this gem is still cranking out great coffee. I had it serviced by the wonderful folks at CoffeeBoss in Cornelius, NC last year, and it's still going strong with a cup count of 9,922. The brew group is not user serviceable, so occasional maintenance should be expected. I use distilled water (at the cost of flavor, I know) now that I'm back in the city on municipal water, so I don't need or use the Clearyl filter (I recommend it for tap/well water, though), and I do use a cleaning tablet within 5-10 cups of when it starts asking for it on the LED display.
The Saeco PicoBaristo HD8924/47 Super-automatic espresso machine is a superior compact coffee machine from one of the world’s best-known manufacturers. It is an Amazon Choice machine, popular with purchasers and the recipient of excellent reviews. The PicoBaristo provides the widest variety of drinks of any compact super-automatic espresso machine.

After extensive researching of current high(er) end coffee machines, I purchased the Jura C65 to replace my Jura F7 - which had finally failed after 11 years of reliable service. Set-up was fast and easy -- instruction booklet is well organized with useful diagrams. Am completing the 1st week of daily use: so far so good. The C65 produces excellent coffee. Controls are less complicated than my old F7, and it is easy to adjust to fit individual tastes -- strength, cup size, temperature, etc. Only fret is reliability -- will it match the duration of the F7?
The ECAM28465 uses an integrated frothing system and the milk container in order to immediately deliver to your cup both the right amount of frothed or steamed milk and freshly brewed espresso. That’s not all though: you also get a dual stainless steel-lined thermoblock heating that provides steaming and brewing power for your various coffee drinks. Lastly, you can say goodbye to espresso and other drinks any metallic taste in your coffee that you probably got with other machines and that’s because the Prima Donna S features a stainless steel lining which prevents that from being the case.
The Jura Capresso Impressa C5 is among the more affordable of the coffee centers from Jura. It is an economical choice for a durable, automatic machine that makes excellent coffee house beverages and cleans up quickly. When you have your espresso machine, you don’t have to worry about getting dressed and standing in line to enjoy delicious cafe coffees.
While all of the brand’s machines take up substantial counter space, you can get all of the advanced features without taking over your kitchen. The Impressa F8 is designed as a two-cup coffee maker - it has dual nozzles in the front so that you can make them side by side. However, you can also use the spouts for perfectly frothed milk instead. So, if you’re looking for a high-quality cappuccino, you will get it without having to do anything extra.
Just by the water canister (which holds just under two litres), there’s a replaceable water filter that cleans the water as the machine begins each cycle. Depending where you live, this may carry a different weight of importance, but if you’re in an area where water has a strong taste, this may well be a big plus towards buying the Jura Impressa F8 over other machines. Water is such a big part of making coffee, it will go a long way towards giving consistent results day after day!

Now that great espresso shots aren't hard to find, this machine is more about convenience and reliability than knock-your-socks-off espresso. But it does make great coffee - better than any Mr. Coffee or even Keurig. I keep Dark Roast Guatemalan Viennese in the bean hopper, pull two one-ounce shots, lengthen them with hot water, and I'm drinking awesome coffee before my neighbor has finished peeling the foil on his can of Maxwell House. And since I'm just buying good old whole beans, it's much cheaper to use than a Keurig.
Maintaining the C60 is a breeze and that’s because it has special descaling and rinsing programs. The latter can be easily programmed while taking into account the hardness of the water in your area and how many times a month you want to use it. If you’re an energy conscious person, then you can program the C60 with designated shut off times in order to save energy when you’re not using the machine.
Have used a SAECO machine for the last ten years.Finally "blew up" and I needed a replacement. Have known the Jura machines for a long time but because of the price never considered purchasing one. Finally had the courage to purchase the Jura J9 and have absolutely no regrets. Makes excellent Espresso or a coffee with a crema. Cappuccinos or Latte Macchiatos are a breeze to make. Wish I would have purchased earlier.

The first notable downside to this economy grinder is the build quality. Although it is standard for high-end burr grinders to use stainless steel enclosures, the Capresso 559 is built from a cheaper plastic. Beyond its suspect longevity, the cheaper build also causes problems in functionality. For example, beans can jam the grinder chute, causing the machine to stop functioning until it is cleaned.
The Gaggia Brera is a great budget super automatic espresso machine that not only has a small form factor, but it’s also very well designed and looks great on any kitchen countertop. When thinking about it, the first thing that comes to the mind of those that already use it is convenience. For example, the water tank, drop tray and the dregs drawer are all within reach and can be easily accessed from the machine for simple, swift maintenance and regular cleaning.

It would be a mistake to say that there’s no learning curve at all on the E8.  It has one; it’s just not particularly steep.  Sure, there are a lot of settings, and a lot of things you can change, tweak and adjust, but honestly, the hardest part of its operation is going to be changing your preferred drink settings and familiarizing yourself with the way the menus work.


These machines and their respective technologies will serve you well, no matter what it is you are looking for. Keep in mind that with all their features and functionality, more expensive machines are almost always going to fall on the side of excessive for casual users. Because of this and their high cost, you may want to pick a few features that stand out to you and forgo the unnecessary frills.
Semi-automatic espresso machines are just that—semi-automatic. Some of the steps are automated, but many are not. This allows the user to put their personal stamp on the final product but without doing some of the tedious steps that are involved in making an espresso on the stove top. Here’s a look at some of the features that make a semi-automatic espresso machine such a great pickup for the ultimate espresso lover:

I had avoided automatics for a while simply because pulling a shot seemed like such a romantic notion. Hah! Switching to a schedule that kicks off at 5:45 AM makes anything 'automatic' look a whole lot sexier. I am setting aside $$$ so that when this one finally fails (and that should be a while - this machine demonstrates superior engineering), I can dart right to the store and buy another.
Starting with the brew unit, the first thing to understand is that it’s not removable.  From a practical perspective, what that means for you is that about once a week, you’ll need to pop a cleansing tab into the bypass doser to clean the unit.  No big deal, but our personal preference is for removable units you can rinse by hand to ensure a thorough cleaning.
For those really into their coffee drinks, and I mean obsessively so, a separate grinder is an absolute must. That loud noise you hear in the coffee shop every time you go in? That’s the grinder. Now, after saying that, let me tell you the grinder in the F7 is quiet and fast. So don’t worry about your kitchen ending up sounding like a coffee shop’s barista station.
Instead of an LCD screen, this model uses a standard LED to show you what kind of coffee you’re making. It’s not quite as involved, but it’s helpful and better than a manual version. With the ENA 9, you can make six different kinds of coffee. It uses two nozzles to layer your beverages perfectly with foam or milk. The frother is a separate unit that connects to the base machine.

If you’ve been using espresso machines for quite a while now, then you are probably fully aware of what makes a good espresso machine. Running a fifteen-bar pressure into the grounds, the Jura C65 can easily extract the right flavor from your coffee beans. Better yet, you can use its wide range of programmable options in order to adjust the brewing temperatures with two levels to boot, coffee strength (in four levels) and also the amount of water used.

The Capresso EC100 offers you the chance to get creative and add variety to your coffee drinks, not only with espresso shots but also with lattes and cappuccinos using this espresso machine's two-part frother. This espresso maker comes with a frothing sleeve that lets you swirl hot steam and air into your milk to make a rich and foamy topping for your cappuccinos. You can remove the frothing sleeve and use the underlying steam tube that puts hot steam into milk, making it possible to make lattes.
The ENO Micro is one of the latest offerings from Jura that signals their move toward more compact units that consume less real estate in the kitchen. In fact, this particular unit is actually shorter than the older compact ENA line by a few inches. We love its small size and low profile, and find that its unassuming presence adds to the impact when the coffee start being made. Some users actually prefer the larger Jura units, but we prefer the Micro 9’s size and simplicity. The Jura ENA Micro 9 is the world’s smallest one-touch cappuccino maker but that certainly does not mean that they skimped on features or design elements.
Yeah! It has them but what doesn’t? The main complaint on the reviews is the small water and bean container. It only holds 37 ounces of water compared to others that hold 60 ounces. Another one is the max cup size, giving you only 5 inches to work with. Travel coffee cups won’t fit under the spout. The last complaint is the lack of a cup warmer probably because there was no room with this slim design.
From the outside, the Giga 5 looks attractive. It has a color TFT (thin film transistor) LCD screen display on the top front and center, with a stylish aluminum chassis with black plastic sides. This unit will definitely enhance the look of any kitchen. There’s a dedicated hot water spout at the front of the machine plus a couple of adjustable spouts for making coffee. Located on top of the unit you will find on/off buttons, a program button, and a rotary switch that is key to navigating the Giga’s menu.
Aside from the flexibility of using either the supplied gold filter or store-bought paper ones, the Capresso MT600 sports other thoughtful extras. For instance, the right side of the water tower not only features a graduated water indicator which is a staple for these type of products, but its tank fluid gauge boasts a floating red bead that makes it a cinch to see exactly where the water line is in relation to its 10 cup capacity. Frankly, it's a trick I wish other coffee makers employed.
Mixed Reviews. Searching various sources, Jura ENA 5 Reviews seem to have either “love it” or “hate it” reviews and very few in between. This can indicate that the machine is a good design that works well at first, but may not in the long run, and the company is not always stellar at getting machines fixed. Common themes among negative reviews include broken parts and the machines simply stopped functioning.
For those who tend to like their java a bit more robust and flavorful, this espresso machine offers a coffee and steam wand that you can use to adjust the potency of your coffee. If you prefer a bit less vigor to your morning espresso, simply move the wand to the steam side to add a bit more water. This will allow you to share your espresso maker with those around you who prefer a stronger or milder taste you do and still keep everyone happy.
Although the low RPM motor is a fantastic feature of this Capresso grinder, it may struggle with darker, oilier beans on the finest grind settings. The mechanical timer is also not as precise as one would wish, as the machine begins grinding the moment you turn the dial. As a result, grind quantities are fairly inconsistent. Another notable disadvantage is the fact that the 565’s bean hopper is not entirely airtight, making it unsuitable for storing coffee beans for more than a few days at a time. Finally, due to the design of its grind chute and a recurring problem with static cling, this grinder can get fairly messy.
When the milk is finally steamed on the dual element system, the machine is ready to continue making more espresso shots. Keep in mind that if you choose to get a single element machine, you’ll need to wait five minutes so that the boiler can cool off naturally and then run hot water through the steam wand for ten seconds in order to purge the boiler of steam.

02/12/2000 - Purchased Capresso C1000 unit at William-Sonoma for $899. Manually cleaning the internal screen after every few cycles is no big deal. The User’s Manual documentation is a bit over-engineered and could be simplified or reformatted for easier reading and troubleshooting. You do not want to use oily coffee beans as they will stick together and clog the burr grinder. The grinder is also bit noisy, yet produces the perfect cup of pressure-brewed coffee or espresso every time. After using this for a week, I’ve never enjoyed coffee from anyone else including formal restaurants. It was initially pricey but definitely worth every cup.
One downside of the C65 is that it isn’t self-cleaning. If you don’t mind taking it apart and rinsing everything out manually, then that shouldn’t be an issue. However, as James mentioned, sometimes the bean holder will think that it’s empty when there are still grounds inside. Overall, it is a minor inconvenience, but it can be frustrating when you’re running late in the morning, and you get a smaller cup as a result.
You don’t really need to be a coffee connoisseur to be able to prepare your own drinks with this coffee machine. There are recipes for 12 coffee creations which you can select with the rotary switch. The machine uses images and texts to guide users through the preparation stages. You can prepare coffee choices such as Irish coffee, flavored latte macchiato, Viennese coffee, and Café Melange, amongst others. In addition, this coffee machine is also self cleaning to eliminate any excuses when it comes to making speciality coffee at home.

Some of the more popular mass market coffee machines are starting to look a little bit dated (not least the hugely popular and bestselling ESAM4200 by Delonghi), but that couldn’t be further from the truth with the Jura Impressa F8. It’s a very stylish and sophisticated looking machine, that wouldn’t look out of place in an upmarket cafe or bar. Jura have managed to pack a lot of controls in to the unit to give near unparalleled control over coffee making, yet retain a fairly minimalist look. There’s something about a black and silver finish that just looks the part, particularly on kitchen appliances that sit on the worktop – you don’t want something ugly to look at as a permanent fixture in the kitchen!
When the milk is finally steamed on the dual element system, the machine is ready to continue making more espresso shots. Keep in mind that if you choose to get a single element machine, you’ll need to wait five minutes so that the boiler can cool off naturally and then run hot water through the steam wand for ten seconds in order to purge the boiler of steam.
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