Embodying the tradition and soul of over seven and a half decades of experienced in one super automatic espresso machine, the new Gaggia Anima is one of the top fully automatic espresso machines you can currently get. The incredible beauty of this model combines tradition and modernity in a distinctive and elegant design that can easily outlive trends and fads. When it comes to how easy it is to use it, the Anima features a digital display and designated drink buttons, meaning that no matter if you want to enjoy a cappuccino or espresso shot, you can easily program the machine to do it in seconds. Better yet, to suit your preferences, you can easily customize each drink option in order to get the perfect taste.
To make it easy for you, we’ve gathered up the best espresso machines on the market, carefully weighed, and prioritized several criteria in testing and put together these targeted espresso machine reviews that are specifically meant to help you cut through all the confusion and just get the best deal on the home espresso maker that fits your style.
The buttons of the Jura XS90 can be easily programmed for setting volume, strength and temperature of the espresso dispensed. If you take a closer look at the right side of the XS90, you’ll notice that the multi function button is perfect for programming the lattes or cappuccino, including the strength and amount of milk, but also the temperature of espresso dispensed. If you want, then you can even adjust the milk’s foaminess.
When comparing Jura models, it becomes clear quickly that Giga 5 is the behemoth in the family most areas. This model tops this list in terms of price, size and features. If you want the top of the line Jura, the Giga 5 is your model. It sets a new standard for Jura in looks, function and excellent coffee made at the touch of a button. With the Giga 5, you are going to be looking at double everything. With two grinders and two heaters, the 5 makes two specialty coffee drinks at the same time.
Yep, the Barista Express isn’t just an elegant, well-built espresso machine – it also features a built-in grinder, allowing you to make coffee with beans you’ve smashed into dust literally seconds earlier. Freshness means a lot in the coffee world, so this is a Big Deal – as is the low-pressure pre-infusion of the grounds before the water is forced through them at higher 50 bar pressure.
Save a lot of money – If you calculate how much money you are spending on a monthly basis on regular visits to coffee shops, the amount would be very high. Also, this may or may not increase every month. You can make a variety of coffee drinks at home with just one espresso machine. Buying Jura coffee machine is a one-time investment. It will help you save a lot of money in coffee shops.  
As a home barista, you need to master all the above techniques to get the right espresso. If you make a little mistake you compromise your shot. As a result, you’ll get an average shot. Even if you know what it takes to get your shot right, there is very little room for error. Failed shots are pretty common with beginner baristas. You probably noticed in coffee shops that the shot differs from barista to barista.

Edit - 01/15/2015: Eight and a half years later, this gem is still cranking out great coffee. I had it serviced by the wonderful folks at CoffeeBoss in Cornelius, NC last year, and it's still going strong with a cup count of 9,922. The brew group is not user serviceable, so occasional maintenance should be expected. I use distilled water (at the cost of flavor, I know) now that I'm back in the city on municipal water, so I don't need or use the Clearyl filter (I recommend it for tap/well water, though), and I do use a cleaning tablet within 5-10 cups of when it starts asking for it on the LED display.
Like the Sage Express, Panasonic’s NC-ZA1 is a “bean to cup” espresso machine: it takes whole beans, grinds them and pushes hot water through them at pressure to produce a cup of coffee. That’s pretty much where the similarities end, however, because unlike the old-school Express, the NC-ZA1 makes almost the entire process automated – and controllable via touchscreen.
First of all, the TFT display will notify you when you are running low on anything (which the F8 lacks), and it will tell you when it needs cleaning. Having this kind of automatic reminders ensures that you can extend the lifespan of your machine. The other thing that we like about the E6 better than the F8 is the grinder. The G3 grinder system is a significant improvement.
In front of the water tank sits a large cone that holds either the machine's permanent gold filter or reusable Type 4 paper filters. Below that is a sturdy stainless steel thermal carafe to accept and decant your brew. On the left side of the metal coffee pot, you'll find a small keypad complete with tiny LCD screen and minuscule membrane-style buttons. The display also includes a digital clock for checking the time and programming automatic brewing cycles.
You can also make milky or foamed coffees, thanks to a tube that can be placed in a milk jug (or Panasonic’s own optional “Milktank” accessory). Or just have the machine squirt out hot water for tea-making. You can also tweak the amount of coffee, water and milk, and the temperature before a drink is made, and save up to four of these combinations on the machine as personal favourites.

When comparing Jura models, it becomes clear quickly that Giga 5 is the behemoth in the family most areas. This model tops this list in terms of price, size and features. If you want the top of the line Jura, the Giga 5 is your model. It sets a new standard for Jura in looks, function and excellent coffee made at the touch of a button. With the Giga 5, you are going to be looking at double everything. With two grinders and two heaters, the 5 makes two specialty coffee drinks at the same time.
I love this machine. I also have a krupps super automatic as well and I prefer this one. One complaint though is that the spout height is slightly low and so I cannot fit certain mugs in there. Not a deal breaker but it is an inconvenience. The thing I like about the jura is the ability to bypass the whole bean grinder and use preground coffee. Since with any super automatic, you need to be very careful about the oiliness of the bean, this is a great feature when you still want flavored coffee. The interface isn't very difficult to learn and it is quite the beauty sitting on the counter.
Turn, press, enjoy – that’s how easy it is to enter the world of IMPRESSA C65 With the one-switch operating concept of the Rotary Switch and the 11-language plain text display, it’s easy to create the perfect coffee every time. Thanks to the high-performance conical grinder, the beans are always freshly ground. The simple, compact design with its elegant combination of matte and gloss black gives the IMPRESSA C65 an imposing yet understated look in any surroundings.
The first notable downside to this economy grinder is the build quality. Although it is standard for high-end burr grinders to use stainless steel enclosures, the Capresso 559 is built from a cheaper plastic. Beyond its suspect longevity, the cheaper build also causes problems in functionality. For example, beans can jam the grinder chute, causing the machine to stop functioning until it is cleaned. 

First, I really wanted to like this machine. The specs, design, functionality, were exactly what I was looking for in a super automatic espresso machine, however the machine failed to perform the basic task of making espresso. I found the display, programming, controls, and size of the water chamber to be good. The milk frothing system was cumbersome as it required you to attach tubes each time you wanted a milk drink. When the system worked, the steamed milk was hot and the consistency was great for cappuccinos and lattes. However, if the tube was not connected precisely (very little room for error) the consistency of the milk was poor. I ended up having to restart the process several times as the tubes were not connected properly or they came loose as the milk was pumped. The tubes also presented an issue with clean up in that they had to be cleaned after each use.

“I Love the convenience of having an automatic Cappuccino machine; it's easy to use and work around if you're used to electronic machines. I like the fact it cleans itself but what the manual and reviews don’t tell you - ALWAYS HAVE A CUP UNDER IT as it rinses a lot and sometimes it does it automatically. So Far So good hope it lasts for years and years.” - Duha, Amazon Customer
There’s no steam wand for heating and foaming milk, but the Dolce Gusto system has its own way of doing that: drinks such as cappuccinos and lattes are made with two pods: one coffee pod and one special milk pod, used in the amounts specified on the pod lid. Drinking milk expelled from a pod isn’t as appetising as fresh cow juice, we think you’ll agree – but it’s less effort and less mess.
I'm not a heavy coffee drinker but after working as a barista in a coffee house, I am a little particular about exactly how I like it. I've used a professional machine and the F9 is *easier* to use and even with 4 less bars of pressure than commercial models it still produces very comparable results. Also is faster to use than commercial machines since it stores the beans, grinds, tamps, and even collects the spent grounds. The Jura Capresso F9 allows you to make coffee or espresso in the EXACT amount, temperature, and strength you prefer. You can also use the hot water only function for brewing hot tea or Americano style coffee beverages. The touch screen is extremely easy to navigate, and the unit is easy to clean, prompting you to do so when needed. Hmmm... did I say *easy*?
Jura Giga 5: Setting new standards in performance and aesthetics, the Giga 5 features two ceramic disc grinders, 2.6-liter water tank, a monitored drip tray, two heating systems, a variable brewing chamber, height-adjustable coffee spout and an Intelligent Pre-Brew Aroma system that allows the coffee aroma to fully develop. It’s professional technology that lets you brew an unprecedented range of drinks in the comfort of your own home.

Jura machines all have self-cleaning technologies that prevent scaling, powder buildup, and other problems typical of the industry. That being said, you will need to become familiar with and regularly purchase self-cleaning fluids and tablets that the machine uses to maintain itself. These products are typically included on the page where you buy, but in the event that they are not, we have you covered in our reviews.
Our final Jura Coffee Maker is technically classified as an espresso maker. As such, it’s only designed for espressos, although you can experiment to make different kinds of beverages if you want. As an espresso machine, this unit is really impressive. If you have used other similar models, you will be impressed by the quality and convenience that the Ena Micro 1 offers.
With a built-in coffee grinder, the Ena Micro 1 will grind your beans just before brewing, and store your beans in an airtight, aroma-preserving chamber on top of the machine. The variable brewing chamber allows for you to choose the individual preparation and strength of two cups at one time. And the included filter ensures your water is as pure as possible for the best-tasting espresso around.

The other point that we wanted to highlight isn’t necessarily a negative per se, but just the fact that it’s a lot to spend, and let’s face it – it is! There’s a lot of machines available in the sub £500 range, and we’d never advocate or encourage spending more than you can afford. Having said that, you do get what you pay for, and in this case we believe it’s exceptional quality. If you really love coffee, it’s probably worth paying as much as you’re comfortable with to get a great machine, and that’s exactly what you’re getting here.
And that’s it. There’s very little in the way of cleaning or maintenance to be done, bar an occasional emptying of the drip tray, an occasional rinsing of the removable pod holder and, of course, the refilling of the water tank. The tank isn’t huge (0.8l), so you’ll need to do the latter fairly frequently. The drip tray, for its part, is adjustable – you can place it at one of three heights to suit the size of drinking vessel and reduce the chance of spillage.
It’s a lovely looking, all-metal thing, with even accessories like the tamper and milk jug exuding an air of quiet, understated luxury. The portafilter is reassuringly weighty and solid, locking into the group head with a satisfying twist. There are clever little touches you can’t see or immediately feel that add to the feeling of quality too: on top is a tray that warms your cups, and the 2l water tank has an integrated, changeable filter.

As a home barista, you need to master all the above techniques to get the right espresso. If you make a little mistake you compromise your shot. As a result, you’ll get an average shot. Even if you know what it takes to get your shot right, there is very little room for error. Failed shots are pretty common with beginner baristas. You probably noticed in coffee shops that the shot differs from barista to barista.
The very first espresso machines worked on a steam-pressure basis, and they’re still in use today. With this type of machine, steam or steam pressure is used to force water through the coffee grounds and produce espresso. Some steam-driven machines can produce a measure of foam “crema.” But they can’t generate enough pressure or provide the precise temperature control necessary to produce true espresso: They simply make a very strong cup of coffee. However, they cost considerably less than pump-driven machines. Our verdict is that if you’re a true espresso lover and seeking to make a good shot at home, we recommend you steer clear of steam-driven machines. They’ll likely disappoint you.
Although the low RPM motor is a fantastic feature of this Capresso grinder, it may struggle with darker, oilier beans on the finest grind settings. The mechanical timer is also not as precise as one would wish, as the machine begins grinding the moment you turn the dial. As a result, grind quantities are fairly inconsistent. Another notable disadvantage is the fact that the 565’s bean hopper is not entirely airtight, making it unsuitable for storing coffee beans for more than a few days at a time. Finally, due to the design of its grind chute and a recurring problem with static cling, this grinder can get fairly messy.
Jura Giga 5: Setting new standards in performance and aesthetics, the Giga 5 features two ceramic disc grinders, 2.6-liter water tank, a monitored drip tray, two heating systems, a variable brewing chamber, height-adjustable coffee spout and an Intelligent Pre-Brew Aroma system that allows the coffee aroma to fully develop. It’s professional technology that lets you brew an unprecedented range of drinks in the comfort of your own home.
With many of the Jura models available in our review guide, you will be able to control the unit with a large, stunning visual screen that is controlled by buttons on the side and a rotary dial on the top of the unit. With the buttons on the side of the screen, you select a class of coffee beverage such as espresso or plain coffee. After you decide your class of drink, you can literally turn the dial and watch the different drink selections go by until you find one that suits your mood. The interface is finely tuned and at no point does it feel cumbersome or stand in your way. The Jura is an extension of your coffee desires and the only thing standing between you and your perfect drink is the press of a button. For the models that don’t feature the visual display, there is an equally easy to use and ergonomically arranged display of buttons. The three green, yellow, and red lights, coupled with the rotary knob delivery your desired beverage just as quickly and with zero confusion as to how to select it.
The Achilles heel of any super automatic, brewing times are, in my opinion, far too short for proper extraction of the good stuff from ground coffee. Part of the problem is the puck diameter - 46ml in the Jura Capresso S9. The other problem (and I blame the Swiss for this and their gosh darn love for caffe suise), is that the grinder can't be dialed fine enough.
Some machines can be quite slow to work their way through programmes, but Jura have put a lot of thought into minimising these delays. The water heating tends to be the cause of the waits, so the F8’s solution is to heat it as it passes through the internal pipes of the machine. The technical detail is a bit beyond us, but it seems to work well. If you want to know more and like the geeky detail, give ‘Jura Thermoblock’ a Google!
The Capresso EC-100 comes with a generous number of safety features, which you find in the best home espresso machines. These include a short electrical cord so that nothing is dangling down within reach of a youngster's eager hands, which could pose serious risks to a child. The polarized plug means your espresso maker can only be plugged in one way. Since this model is equipped with on and off indicator lights, it's easy to tell that your machine is off when you want it to be and not worry about accidents, burns or fire.
I have owned this for about 9 months and gotten nearly 1000 uses out of it (it counts for you). It can equal most coffeehouse product you are likely to find, but as others point out, it is far short of what an enthusiast can create from more traditional equipment. You may also find the crema coffee settings to be something of an acquired taste (but you can make an Americano in just one more step, which is always great).
The shining feature of the Jura is just how freshly the coffee is before its brewed. With conventional drip coffee makers, you load it with pre-ground coffee that has a good chance of already being somewhat stale. After all, ground coffee starts to go downhill quickly after being ground. Slightly more expensive drip coffee makers try to solve this problem by allowing you to set a timer to grind the coffee fresh every morning, but it’s still going to sit there for some length of time before it gets brewed. The Jura coffee machine has cracked the code by grinding beans fresh for every single cup of coffee, espresso, cappuccino or latte. It doesn’t grind it until you are about to drink it, which gives you a fresher cup of coffee than most coffee shops will be able to provide. Not having to grind the coffee yourself and then clean the grinder is on it’s own and huge step in the direction of convenience.
Although the low RPM motor is a fantastic feature of this Capresso grinder, it may struggle with darker, oilier beans on the finest grind settings. The mechanical timer is also not as precise as one would wish, as the machine begins grinding the moment you turn the dial. As a result, grind quantities are fairly inconsistent. Another notable disadvantage is the fact that the 565’s bean hopper is not entirely airtight, making it unsuitable for storing coffee beans for more than a few days at a time. Finally, due to the design of its grind chute and a recurring problem with static cling, this grinder can get fairly messy.
I was somewhat apprehensive about purchasing this, but 2 weeks in very satisfied with our purchase. The coffee and espresso quality is excellent. Pleasantly surprised with the milk steamer, the lattes I’ve made are as good as any big coffee shop. It’s also easy to maintain and clean, takes about 2 minutes everyday. I can’t imagine a machine being easier to use.
Due to the lower register of the running motor, the Capresso 503.05 is much quieter than most blade grinders; this machine isn’t likely to wake up your family in the morning. Great build quality and fantastic machining make this one of the most durable blade grinders available.Despite the attractive design, fantastic build quality, and convenient features, this is still just a blade grinder.
It would be a mistake to say that there’s no learning curve at all on the E8.  It has one; it’s just not particularly steep.  Sure, there are a lot of settings, and a lot of things you can change, tweak and adjust, but honestly, the hardest part of its operation is going to be changing your preferred drink settings and familiarizing yourself with the way the menus work.

This is probably one of the more important points to note – just how easy it is to get started. Bean to cup coffee machines tend to fall into two categories, they are either easy to use but inflexible, or take time to master and give a lot of opportunity to experiment. This Jura machine gives a lot of scope to both, which is great if you’re short on practice time or not sure if you’ve got the skills needed just yet.
As previously mentioned, this grinder is a bit less sturdy than its new revision, the 565. The 560 has the same issues with its mechanical timer, with the grind mechanism starting before you have had a chance to set the time. This results in a somewhat inconsistent grind quantity. The hopper lid is also not completely airtight, so it isn’t recommended that you keep your beans in it for more than a few days. The same issue with static buildup is also present, and may lead to a messy countertop.
It’s highly efficient, meaning that you don’t get as much ground residue after processing your beans. Not only does this ensure that your coffee tastes (and smells) better, but it saves on the cleaning process. Finally, the E6 has a separate milk frother and spout. Instead of pouring milk through one of the nozzles that can be used for coffee (this model also can make two cups simultaneously), the E6 keeps it all separated.
Everything we discussed points to the Jura’s mission of making great coffee and espresso beverages at home easier. The Swiss made precision and modern design is simply an added bonus. Want your coffee freshly ground on a cup-by-cup basis? The Jura does that as a matter of course. Don’t feel like dirtying and cleaning several different pieces of equipment just to froth milk? The Jura takes care of this by warming, frothing and dispensing the milk for you. It will also clean the lines so you don’t have to word about old milk in your system. Best of all, as a consumer you can choose the coffee you want to drink while still having the convenience of single serve brewing.

Anyone who is looking for the perfect espresso machine, should certainly take a closer look at the Cuisinart EM-600. This model is able to brew excellent traditional coffee beverages and espresso shots at the touch of a button and without you having to worry about moving the cup. The EM-600 incorporates a removable milk tank (22 oz) which sends frothy, creamy and hot milk right into your cup for barista quality, hands free latte and cappuccino. If you want to use it with the Illy Espresso capsule system, you’ll be very happy to know that this model offers innovative froth controls, flavor strength and temperature control with the push of a button.
I love this machine. I also have a krupps super automatic as well and I prefer this one. One complaint though is that the spout height is slightly low and so I cannot fit certain mugs in there. Not a deal breaker but it is an inconvenience. The thing I like about the jura is the ability to bypass the whole bean grinder and use preground coffee. Since with any super automatic, you need to be very careful about the oiliness of the bean, this is a great feature when you still want flavored coffee. The interface isn't very difficult to learn and it is quite the beauty sitting on the counter.
The new Gaggia Brera is a very impressive super automatic espresso machine that has a small form factor, making it perfect for use on small kitchen countertops. Not only that, but it seems that the company has focused, among other things, to ensure that the Brera fully maximizes user convenience. For instance, the water tank, drop tray and the dregs drawer are all within reach and can be easily accessed from the machine for simple, swift maintenance and regular cleaning. With this model, beverage selection and machine programming has been greatly simplified, allowing users to easily navigate through the options which are certainly more than you’d expect from such a small machine.
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