“My first impression was a great machine well built; the manual was more challenging than it should have been but not hard to follow. Once I got the machine set up it's been delivering consistently great coffee, the dry grounds it produces make cleaning easy, the display makes maintenance pretty self-explanatory, the operation is quiet, and it's an obvious improvement over my previous machine.
Because this Capresso grinder uses the same high-quality, low RPM conical burr grinder design as the 565, this machine preserves the subtlest aromatics of your coffee beans. It produces a consistent, uniform, and delicious grind in 16 settings, suitable for almost any brew types. Its large hopper is convenient, and will store several days worth of beans at a time.
The very first espresso machines worked on a steam-pressure basis, and they’re still in use today. With this type of machine, steam or steam pressure is used to force water through the coffee grounds and produce espresso. Some steam-driven machines can produce a measure of foam “crema.” But they can’t generate enough pressure or provide the precise temperature control necessary to produce true espresso: They simply make a very strong cup of coffee. However, they cost considerably less than pump-driven machines. Our verdict is that if you’re a true espresso lover and seeking to make a good shot at home, we recommend you steer clear of steam-driven machines. They’ll likely disappoint you.
And that’s it. There’s very little in the way of cleaning or maintenance to be done, bar an occasional emptying of the drip tray, an occasional rinsing of the removable pod holder and, of course, the refilling of the water tank. The tank isn’t huge (0.8l), so you’ll need to do the latter fairly frequently. The drip tray, for its part, is adjustable – you can place it at one of three heights to suit the size of drinking vessel and reduce the chance of spillage.
The very first espresso machines worked on a steam-pressure basis, and they’re still in use today. With this type of machine, steam or steam pressure is used to force water through the coffee grounds and produce espresso. Some steam-driven machines can produce a measure of foam “crema.” But they can’t generate enough pressure or provide the precise temperature control necessary to produce true espresso: They simply make a very strong cup of coffee. However, they cost considerably less than pump-driven machines. Our verdict is that if you’re a true espresso lover and seeking to make a good shot at home, we recommend you steer clear of steam-driven machines. They’ll likely disappoint you.
In front of the water tank sits a large cone that holds either the machine's permanent gold filter or reusable Type 4 paper filters. Below that is a sturdy stainless steel thermal carafe to accept and decant your brew. On the left side of the metal coffee pot, you'll find a small keypad complete with tiny LCD screen and minuscule membrane-style buttons. The display also includes a digital clock for checking the time and programming automatic brewing cycles.
The ENA Micro 5 is the next level of technology in the ENA Micro line. It is also one of the smallest machines on the list, fairly priced, and incorporates more functionality into the machine than the ENA Micro 1. This includes the option to brew two cups of espresso at the same time, with a dual and height-adjustable spout, as well as Aroma+ technology to keep your coffee beans fresh.
Now that great espresso shots aren't hard to find, this machine is more about convenience and reliability than knock-your-socks-off espresso. But it does make great coffee - better than any Mr. Coffee or even Keurig. I keep Dark Roast Guatemalan Viennese in the bean hopper, pull two one-ounce shots, lengthen them with hot water, and I'm drinking awesome coffee before my neighbor has finished peeling the foil on his can of Maxwell House. And since I'm just buying good old whole beans, it's much cheaper to use than a Keurig.
These machines and their respective technologies will serve you well, no matter what it is you are looking for. Keep in mind that with all their features and functionality, more expensive machines are almost always going to fall on the side of excessive for casual users. Because of this and their high cost, you may want to pick a few features that stand out to you and forgo the unnecessary frills.
The IPBAS system is a special 2 step pre infusion cycle that conditions and also moistens the ground coffee to get the best flavor extraction with excellent crema topping. Thanks to the great functionality of the F50, you can brew from 1 to 16 oz cups of coffee in 5 different strength settings. It can also grind from five to max sixteen g of coffee, ranging in strength from extra mild to extra strong.
There are many ways to make a single coffee drink and preferences will naturally vary. With the Jura coffee machine, there are tons of opportunities to customize the details and fine-tune your daily coffee experience. If there is something you don’t like or want prepared differently, you can reprogram the ratios for certain beverages to match your personal tastes. For example, if you like you macchiato with slightly less milk (I know I do), you can adjust the ratio so there is a bit more coffee than the factory setting serves. If you like your coffee extra hot, that setting can be adjusted globally on the Jura as well. Don’t worry though, anything you customize can be reversed for a one off coffee drink in case you want to make something for a guest and they don’t necessarily share you tastes in coffee. We love that Jura understands everyone has slightly difference tastes and makes adjusting the settings of the machine easy to do.
Excellent work horse. We purchased the Jura-Capresso Impressa F9 16 years ago for a wedding present to us and we have never had any issues with it...it's an excellent product. We have sent it back to the maker to have it cleaned a couple of times over the years and the service has been fantastic. Don't let the price throw you off....it's worth every penny.
Aside from the flexibility of using either the supplied gold filter or store-bought paper ones, the Capresso MT600 sports other thoughtful extras. For instance, the right side of the water tower not only features a graduated water indicator which is a staple for these type of products, but its tank fluid gauge boasts a floating red bead that makes it a cinch to see exactly where the water line is in relation to its 10 cup capacity. Frankly, it's a trick I wish other coffee makers employed.
Before we get into the technical aspects of the two types of espresso machines, here’s what you really need to know. Semi-automatic espresso machines are going to be perfect for the espresso connoisseur. If you’re the type that really wants to get the best-quality and taste out of your espresso machine and don’t mind taking a little more time and effort out of your schedule, the semi-automatic espresso maker is going to be for you. It’s a little bit more work, but the key here is that you ultimately have more control over every subtle nuance that goes into your version of the perfect shot of espresso with a semi-automatic.
You should definitely consider the Saeco Intelia Cappuccino Deluxe Automatic Espresso Machine if you want the convenience of a super automatic espresso machine that is well designed and has a rich set of features with counter-top convenience. This Saeco Intelia Cappuccino Deluxe Automatic Espresso Machine is loaded with features and is an excellent choice. For more detailed information, see our complete review here.

Turn, press, enjoy – that’s how easy it is to enter the world of IMPRESSA C65 With the one-switch operating concept of the Rotary Switch and the 11-language plain text display, it’s easy to create the perfect coffee every time. Thanks to the high-performance conical grinder, the beans are always freshly ground. The simple, compact design with its elegant combination of matte and gloss black gives the IMPRESSA C65 an imposing yet understated look in any surroundings.
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