I like that it does much the same as the higher end models do. The simple fact that it doesnt have a digital read out is to me the only difference between it and say and E8 model which is generaly more money. It makes great coffee as well as hot tea and the temperature is plenty hot while not being too hot. The steam frother makes some of the best froth I have ever experienced. Good sized reservoir compared to most. Simple to learn how to operate and clean. I bought it because my daughter was taking her E8 away and I didnt want to spend as much as she did.
Semi-automatic espresso machines are just that—semi-automatic. Some of the steps are automated, but many are not. This allows the user to put their personal stamp on the final product but without doing some of the tedious steps that are involved in making an espresso on the stove top. Here’s a look at some of the features that make a semi-automatic espresso machine such a great pickup for the ultimate espresso lover:
I only have one minor quibble with this machine; if you like cappuccino, it produces foam that is weak and deflates easily. I have troubleshot this problem from every possible angle (tried different percent milkfat, different milks(soy), different milk temps etc.) and the results were still a little disappointing. I purchased the Milk Frothing accessory designed for this unit and still could not produce the more velvety foam I was seeking. The easiest fix for this is to buy an Aerolatte: steam your milk with the F9 (the steam function works great) and then whip till your hearts content with the Aerolatte. For an extra $15 bucks spent on the Aerolatte, you'll have the perfect cup of cappuccino to rival any cafe.
Best of all, thanks to a thermal coffee pot, if you don't polish off the whole pot right away, it will still stay piping hot hours after it was brewed. For $130, the MT600 from Capresso offers all these abilities plus is wrapped up into a snazzy brushed-metal-and-black-plastic frame. Sure, the MT600 won't deliver a truly sublime cup of drip-brewed coffee. For that there's no getting around splurging at least $200 and up for a more capable machine.
And it bears out in the coffee the machine produces: our very first cup was a delicious and gloriously smooth latte with barely a hint of bitterness. The milk steaming wand is excellent too, producing much lighter, airier foam than the (admittedly way, way cheaper) Morphy Richards’ model, and there’s also a hot water spout for those who want to make an Americano by topping up their espresso.

Excellent work horse. We purchased the Jura-Capresso Impressa F9 16 years ago for a wedding present to us and we have never had any issues with it...it's an excellent product. We have sent it back to the maker to have it cleaned a couple of times over the years and the service has been fantastic. Don't let the price throw you off....it's worth every penny.


Jura is a company that well known advancing coffee technology in a way that blends convenience, sophistication, quality and most importantly easy of use into brewing coffee and espresso based beverages in the modern home. Their impressive line of Jura Coffee Makers is the true embodiment of all these values and has been impressing coffee connoisseurs over the last few years with it’s high pressure-brewed- coffee, espressos, cappuccinos and lattes.
With the look of a shrink-rayed professional espresso machine, the grinning fizzog of shaven-headed culinary chemist Heston Blumenthal on the box and a price tag that puts it out of reach of all but the most well-heeled caffeine fiend, the Barista Express (branded as Breville in the US and Sage in the UK) is clearly aimed at those seeking a major step up in their home-brewed coffee.
It’s affordable (£70 at Argos at the time of writing; Dolce Gusto pods are priced at around £4 for a box of 16) and incredibly simple to set up and use. Simply fill the removable water tank with cold H2O, pop your chosen coffee pod into a slide-out drawer at the front, stick a cup under the spout and hit the power button. When it turns from red to green (a mere few seconds) the machine is ready. You then push the water lever either left (for cold drinks) or right (for hot drinks) until the desired amount of your drink is in the cup. Then slide out the drawer, expel the pod and throw it away.

I'm coming up on a year with this machine in December. It can be a little picky about the beans (not oily). But with lavazza super crema beans, it performs quite well. I very seldom get a shot that I don't like. I vary my drinks day to day, and enjoy straight espresso, cortados, lattes, and occasionally coffee. It doesn't disappoint in either of the modes. I don't like that if I program my drink (2 shot espresso) and double tap the start button, it will simply pull double the volume, and not do a full 2 cycles of the double shot. There is a noticeable difference in the quality of the shots when I do this.
Though there are fewer complaints about the frother falling off with the Jura Capresso Impressa J5 than other Jura Capresso Impressa machines, it still seems to be a problem. Some owners replace the frother with another type. It received five stars on amazon.com due to a couple of reviewers unhappy that the machine arrived and didn’t work right out of the box.
The interface is also very clean and easy to use and given the fact that it also has a function for automatic cleaning, you don’t have to worry about cleaning the machine yourself. However, probably the most notable feature (among others) of the XS90 is the fact that it features a low noise design. What I mean by that is that the burr grinder is perfectly insulated and has the lowest noise grinding of any espresso machine on the market today.
Best of all, thanks to a thermal coffee pot, if you don't polish off the whole pot right away, it will still stay piping hot hours after it was brewed. For $130, the MT600 from Capresso offers all these abilities plus is wrapped up into a snazzy brushed-metal-and-black-plastic frame. Sure, the MT600 won't deliver a truly sublime cup of drip-brewed coffee. For that there's no getting around splurging at least $200 and up for a more capable machine.
The new Gaggia Brera is a very impressive super automatic espresso machine that has a small form factor, making it perfect for use on small kitchen countertops. Not only that, but it seems that the company has focused, among other things, to ensure that the Brera fully maximizes user convenience. For instance, the water tank, drop tray and the dregs drawer are all within reach and can be easily accessed from the machine for simple, swift maintenance and regular cleaning. With this model, beverage selection and machine programming has been greatly simplified, allowing users to easily navigate through the options which are certainly more than you’d expect from such a small machine.
×