This hefty Capresso burr grinder is built with a heavy-duty zinc die-cast housing, making it sturdy and reliable. Its large 8-ounce hopper ensures that you won’t be refilling your coffee beans for days. Its burr grinding mechanism produces consistent, uniform grinds in 16 different texture settings, from Turkish at the finest to French press at the coarsest. Because the Capresso 565 has a low RPM, low-heat grinder design, it causes minimal degradation to your coffee beans. 

I have had several super automatic coffee machines in the past 10 years. My wife and I are coffee lovers and our favorite time every day is sitting down together when I get home from work and talking over a cup of our favorite coffee. It was our quest, after we were married, to find the perfect way to brew coffee. it couldn't be the french press. We travel with one since most upscale hotels don't have a coffee maker in the room, but at home we want a perfect cup each time and every time! Our journey started with Saeco and I am not hear to bash their products! I've had 5 Saecos and still own 3. One is our backup. One we use when we entertain and need more than one machine and the third is broken. The broken one was our favorite and newest. I cleaned it one day and when I was reinserting the brew group a little piece of plastic broke and poof, there goes the machine. Of course I'll get it fixed, but this is the type of stuff we have always encountered with Saeco! Great machine...cheaply built. I decided that I was upgrading and trying a different brand. After a tremendous amount of research I settled on the Jura F7 refurbished. An almost $2,000 machine for $699 and a warranty. I couldn't see a risk and have had great luck with buying refurbished items. Let me tell you from the moment it arrived it has been the easiest to use machine we've ever owned! Again, I loved our Saeco's, but they are nothing in comparison to the Jura!!! The speed in which it grinds, tamps, brews and cleans is literally 60 seconds. It is so much quieter than Saeco and cleaning does not involve the removal of anything. Open a lid...drop in a cleaning tab...put a large cup under the spout and BAM...it's cleaning. 15 minutes later my machine said "READY"! I pressed a button and out came another perfectly brewed cup of my favorite coffee from a little plantation in Hawaii!
One downside of the C65 is that it isn’t self-cleaning. If you don’t mind taking it apart and rinsing everything out manually, then that shouldn’t be an issue. However, as James mentioned, sometimes the bean holder will think that it’s empty when there are still grounds inside. Overall, it is a minor inconvenience, but it can be frustrating when you’re running late in the morning, and you get a smaller cup as a result.
Setup is way easier than the manual would have you believe - the pathetic printed booklet is by far the weakest link in this coffee production line. Fitting the water filter and the Smart Connect dongle is not explained well at all. You’ll find answers to most of your questions online - but probably not on JURA’s website. Unofficial YouTube videos proved much more useful.
With the Impressa C9, you get programmed beverage buttons for espresso, cappuccino, coffee, hot water or milk. A 14oz. milk container is included and a burr grinder is built-into the machine. The 64-ounce removable water tank is easy to clean, and the ThermoBlock heating system keeps water at the optimal temperature. With an 18-bar power pump, this machine brews fantastic espresso.
With many of the Jura models available in our review guide, you will be able to control the unit with a large, stunning visual screen that is controlled by buttons on the side and a rotary dial on the top of the unit. With the buttons on the side of the screen, you select a class of coffee beverage such as espresso or plain coffee. After you decide your class of drink, you can literally turn the dial and watch the different drink selections go by until you find one that suits your mood. The interface is finely tuned and at no point does it feel cumbersome or stand in your way. The Jura is an extension of your coffee desires and the only thing standing between you and your perfect drink is the press of a button. For the models that don’t feature the visual display, there is an equally easy to use and ergonomically arranged display of buttons. The three green, yellow, and red lights, coupled with the rotary knob delivery your desired beverage just as quickly and with zero confusion as to how to select it.
The Capresso EC-100 comes with a generous number of safety features, which you find in the best home espresso machines. These include a short electrical cord so that nothing is dangling down within reach of a youngster's eager hands, which could pose serious risks to a child. The polarized plug means your espresso maker can only be plugged in one way. Since this model is equipped with on and off indicator lights, it's easy to tell that your machine is off when you want it to be and not worry about accidents, burns or fire.
Aside from the flexibility of using either the supplied gold filter or store-bought paper ones, the Capresso MT600 sports other thoughtful extras. For instance, the right side of the water tower not only features a graduated water indicator which is a staple for these type of products, but its tank fluid gauge boasts a floating red bead that makes it a cinch to see exactly where the water line is in relation to its 10 cup capacity. Frankly, it's a trick I wish other coffee makers employed.
The new Gaggia Brera is a very impressive super automatic espresso machine that has a small form factor, making it perfect for use on small kitchen countertops. Not only that, but it seems that the company has focused, among other things, to ensure that the Brera fully maximizes user convenience. For instance, the water tank, drop tray and the dregs drawer are all within reach and can be easily accessed from the machine for simple, swift maintenance and regular cleaning. With this model, beverage selection and machine programming has been greatly simplified, allowing users to easily navigate through the options which are certainly more than you’d expect from such a small machine.
I'm coming up on a year with this machine in December. It can be a little picky about the beans (not oily). But with lavazza super crema beans, it performs quite well. I very seldom get a shot that I don't like. I vary my drinks day to day, and enjoy straight espresso, cortados, lattes, and occasionally coffee. It doesn't disappoint in either of the modes. I don't like that if I program my drink (2 shot espresso) and double tap the start button, it will simply pull double the volume, and not do a full 2 cycles of the double shot. There is a noticeable difference in the quality of the shots when I do this.
You also get programmable push-button controls for milk, hot water and espresso outputs and given the fact that the 1003380 Accademia dispenses great beverages on demand, it’s great for those who don’t like to wait for long before their drink is ready. In total, there are 7 buttons that you can use in order to prepare one of the following drinks hot water, latte macchiato, latte, cappuccino, cafe lungo, cafe and of course, espresso.
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