There's one other area needing fixing, not only in these machines but in all super automatics I've ever tried - tiny puck sizes (diameter) = bad extraction. That's not me saying it. That's Dr. Illy and a wide range of scientific tests that the Illy labs have done finding the optimal puck size for superior extraction. At 46mm, these pucks are too tiny.
We’re going to start with a rundown of the features of the Impressa F8, so that you know what you’re getting if you choose to buy. A lot of machines offer the same core functions, so we tend to focus on what stands out, so rest assured, if we rate a machine highly (as we do with this one), it’s going to be a good all rounder unless we specifically say otherwise.

Using the machine the first time was fun - it has lights that shine down on the cup for a very cool look. It is much quieter than our DeLonghi, and very fast to heat up and grind, brew, and dispense the coffee. The crema is very nice, and the coffee tastes great. The drip tray is easy to pull out to the front, and easy to rinse and throw away the grinds. The machine is plastic, which is ok, but the tray where the cup rests is polished silver metal, and has a nice heaviness to it. The J9.3 comes with a Jura milk container and tubes. We don't do a lot of milk drinks, so I didn't mind that you have to do just a bit extra to fill up the container and attach the hose. You could just put a hose into a cup of milk; you don't have to use the Jura container. It made a very nice latte, great foam. It was actually easy to clean and rinse, but you do have to take the time to be there with two cups - one with rinse water and another to catch the dirty water, then repeat. If you don't mind taking a couple extra steps and minutes, then it's easy. The J9.3 came with the Jura milk container.
...I just bought this machine for my girlfriend's new kitchen. The water sensor in the water tank does not stay in place. Therefore, the machine cannot make coffee because it cannot determine whether or not there is any water in the tank. There is a tiny plastic cap that should hold the sensor in place. The cap doesn't clip in, and floats away as soon as the tank is filled. Therefore the entire machine doesn't work.
Six years and 7540 shots of espresso. The only downside of this machine is that it is too easy to use so that you end up drinking more cups than you might otherwise. It's very fast to heat up, both for the main heating block, as well as for steam. The steamer wand takes some practice to get good, tight foam, but once you figure out the technique it's not difficult. The openings in the wand can clog up if you don't wipe it down right after use. I also give a short blast of steam right after that as well. After about five years we bundled it up and sent it in to the factory for cleaning and reconditioning. It came back as good as new and it's still going strong. About the only real negative aspect to the machine is that it tends to be a bit noisy, but probably no more so than someone using a fully manual pull machine and grinder.
This machine can invade your dreams with all its capabilities. One of the coolest is its ability to automatically fully clean itself but don’t forget about the straight forward programming, which is so simple the only time you’ll need the manual is to figure out what buttons to hold down. Last but not lease, the capabilities of customizing your drink is even above the ESAM3500, which is impressive
Although the low RPM motor is a fantastic feature of this Capresso grinder, it may struggle with darker, oilier beans on the finest grind settings. The mechanical timer is also not as precise as one would wish, as the machine begins grinding the moment you turn the dial. As a result, grind quantities are fairly inconsistent. Another notable disadvantage is the fact that the 565’s bean hopper is not entirely airtight, making it unsuitable for storing coffee beans for more than a few days at a time. Finally, due to the design of its grind chute and a recurring problem with static cling, this grinder can get fairly messy.
Although the low RPM motor is a fantastic feature of this Capresso grinder, it may struggle with darker, oilier beans on the finest grind settings. The mechanical timer is also not as precise as one would wish, as the machine begins grinding the moment you turn the dial. As a result, grind quantities are fairly inconsistent. Another notable disadvantage is the fact that the 565’s bean hopper is not entirely airtight, making it unsuitable for storing coffee beans for more than a few days at a time. Finally, due to the design of its grind chute and a recurring problem with static cling, this grinder can get fairly messy.
From the outside, the Giga 5 looks attractive. It has a color TFT (thin film transistor) LCD screen display on the top front and center, with a stylish aluminum chassis with black plastic sides. This unit will definitely enhance the look of any kitchen. There’s a dedicated hot water spout at the front of the machine plus a couple of adjustable spouts for making coffee. Located on top of the unit you will find on/off buttons, a program button, and a rotary switch that is key to navigating the Giga’s menu.
Super automatic espresso machines generally will produce superb macchiato, cappuccino, and chocolate drinks in addition to espresso drinks (such as ristretto). You will pay for the convenience of super automatic, automatic, or semi-automatic espresso machines, but they are a convenient way to produce and re-produce great drinks. Typically, super automatic espresso machines cost from $400 and up. These espresso machines come in multiple styles and sizes. Some automatic espresso machines provide a compact form factor which can attractively sit on a kitchen counter, whereas others are large and best suited to for the truly serious espresso aficionado or as a commercial super automatic espresso machine. The choice is yours.

The IMPRESSA J9 is probably the most popular model after the newer Micro 9 due to its breadth of features and overall precision when brewing and crafting a litany of specialty coffee drinks. The concept behind the J9 could not be simpler: simply use the rotary dial to select your desired drink, press the button, and sit back and enjoy. This model is absolutely beautiful and looks like it was pulled right out of an Italian café. The matte sheen and silver hard plastic give the J9 and functional sophistication that will definitely impress you.
Using the machine the first time was fun - it has lights that shine down on the cup for a very cool look. It is much quieter than our DeLonghi, and very fast to heat up and grind, brew, and dispense the coffee. The crema is very nice, and the coffee tastes great. The drip tray is easy to pull out to the front, and easy to rinse and throw away the grinds. The machine is plastic, which is ok, but the tray where the cup rests is polished silver metal, and has a nice heaviness to it. The J9.3 comes with a Jura milk container and tubes. We don't do a lot of milk drinks, so I didn't mind that you have to do just a bit extra to fill up the container and attach the hose. You could just put a hose into a cup of milk; you don't have to use the Jura container. It made a very nice latte, great foam. It was actually easy to clean and rinse, but you do have to take the time to be there with two cups - one with rinse water and another to catch the dirty water, then repeat. If you don't mind taking a couple extra steps and minutes, then it's easy. The J9.3 came with the Jura milk container.
Don’t you wish there was an easier way to have café-quality coffee without leaving your house? You know the coffee that makes you smile after every sip. Wouldn’t it be great to have a mini café shop, with you being the number one customer, in your kitchen? The Jura Capresso Impressa coffee machine brings delightful made-to-order coffee prepared for perfection without spending $5 every time. Check out the Jura Capresso Impressa S8.
Yep, the Barista Express isn’t just an elegant, well-built espresso machine – it also features a built-in grinder, allowing you to make coffee with beans you’ve smashed into dust literally seconds earlier. Freshness means a lot in the coffee world, so this is a Big Deal – as is the low-pressure pre-infusion of the grounds before the water is forced through them at higher 50 bar pressure.
Flipping open the tank lid reveals a plastic wand that houses a charcoal water filter pod (one is provided in the box). The filter setup sits within a special receptacle on the tank's interior left side. According to Capresso, the gadget will remove up to 82 percent of "the chlorine and other impurities found in tap water, and will do so for about six weeks, assuming you make one pot (10 cups) daily. It's a nice option to have, especially if you live in an area with substandard water, although remembering to swap in a new filter can be a drag.
There are other factors to consider, such as color and material, but most Jura machines come with customizable aesthetics. We will cover more in-depth things to know in the next couple of sections, but for now, hold on to this list of general thoughts as we begin to browse the different Jura lines and examine what each different type of machine has to offer.
Have used a SAECO machine for the last ten years.Finally "blew up" and I needed a replacement. Have known the Jura machines for a long time but because of the price never considered purchasing one. Finally had the courage to purchase the Jura J9 and have absolutely no regrets. Makes excellent Espresso or a coffee with a crema. Cappuccinos or Latte Macchiatos are a breeze to make. Wish I would have purchased earlier.
To enable the filter and coffee machine to communicate, JURA uses modern RFID technology. Any machine fitted with the intelligent water system (I.W.S.®) recognises when a filter is inserted, automatically switches to filter mode and starts the rinsing process. When the filter capacity is nearly used up the machine prompts the user to change the filter. If the filter is not changed, the machine activates descaling mode. After a certain amount of use, the user is prompted to descale the machine. This can only be done when the filter is removed, so there is no more risk of user error resulting from misunderstandings.
×