My first Jura was the F7. I bought it off of Ebay(new) and couldn't have been happier. I was so thrilled with it, that I bought another (F9) and gave my mom the F7 because it was such an awesome machine. It is really remarkable how the machine works. It took me a good 15+ cups to figure out how to make the coffee the way I like it. There are so many options on this machine that effect the taste: Grind, water temp, quantity of beans, quantity of water, etc.... In reference to the service I am amazed. When I received my new F9, I immediately had problems with a couple of the buttons. I called the service center and was on hold for 6-8 minutes. After about a 2 minute conversation with the representative they said that she would just send out a new machine and when I get it to send my old machine back in the box. They paid all postage. No credit card, nothing. I've never heard of such a service before. Absolutely Excellent. I couldn't be happier. It is a great machine that makes very good coffee and looks really nice on the kitchen counter. I love my Jura! As a matter of fact, I believe I am going to go and make myself a decaf latte right down.
The first thing you’ll probably notice when making your coffee is just how quiet the Giga 5 is. This is thanks to the two ceramic disk grinders that occupy each side of the unit and operate just above a whisper. These discs will probably never wear our and the grind on them is extremely precise and always consistent. It offers 18 completely customizable specialty drinks through the intuitive and easy to navigate display which provide enough variety to satisfy everyone’s tastes.
The Wrap-up: While someone with simple tastes may be content with a twenty dollar automatic drip coffee maker or instant powders, real coffee lovers will appreciate the finer points of the Jura-Capresso S8. Not only will this superb machine turn out brews worthy of elegant European cafes, but it does so with a surprisingly little effort from the user, thanks to its simple “one-touch” programming.

Using the machine the first time was fun - it has lights that shine down on the cup for a very cool look. It is much quieter than our DeLonghi, and very fast to heat up and grind, brew, and dispense the coffee. The crema is very nice, and the coffee tastes great. The drip tray is easy to pull out to the front, and easy to rinse and throw away the grinds. The machine is plastic, which is ok, but the tray where the cup rests is polished silver metal, and has a nice heaviness to it. The J9.3 comes with a Jura milk container and tubes. We don't do a lot of milk drinks, so I didn't mind that you have to do just a bit extra to fill up the container and attach the hose. You could just put a hose into a cup of milk; you don't have to use the Jura container. It made a very nice latte, great foam. It was actually easy to clean and rinse, but you do have to take the time to be there with two cups - one with rinse water and another to catch the dirty water, then repeat. If you don't mind taking a couple extra steps and minutes, then it's easy. The J9.3 came with the Jura milk container.
Not trouble free, as they all seem to jam periodically, but easily fixed. Per J-C, the problem is using very oily beans, which we do as we love very dark, heavily roasted Starbucks beans. The part that jams is the press mechanism. When it expresses the puck, it clogs and won't go back up. This seems to be a criticism for many of its machines, but it's hardly a deal breaker.
Like the Sage Express, Panasonic’s NC-ZA1 is a “bean to cup” espresso machine: it takes whole beans, grinds them and pushes hot water through them at pressure to produce a cup of coffee. That’s pretty much where the similarities end, however, because unlike the old-school Express, the NC-ZA1 makes almost the entire process automated – and controllable via touchscreen.
Of course, this is not all and you get a wide range of other impressive functions, such as ceramic valve technology, pre-ground option for decaf, 1-touch cappuccino system, large bean hopper with sensor and adjustable height brew spouts. Therefore, if you’re looking for the ultimate in espresso machines, then you certainly need to consider the Jura XS90 and experience how the perfect espresso shot actually tastes like.

The Impressa Z6 employs Jura’s innovative Pulse Extraction Process brewing system. As opposed to a constant flow, water is instead pulsed through the grounds in short intervals that extract greater intensity and aroma while shortening the overall brew time. With P.E.P., espresso and ristretto can be prepared with greater clarity and flavor than ever before.
Jura designates a new line of coffee machines whenever a major technological breakthrough is achieved. We will review these technologies in-depth in the following section, and provide more specs when we cover each individual machine. If you see a term that you don’t immediately understand, don’t worry, just reference the glossary in the next section!
Yeah! It has them but what doesn’t? The main complaint on the reviews is the small water and bean container. It only holds 37 ounces of water compared to others that hold 60 ounces. Another one is the max cup size, giving you only 5 inches to work with. Travel coffee cups won’t fit under the spout. The last complaint is the lack of a cup warmer probably because there was no room with this slim design.
Jura does not make any budget-friendly machines, so you should come in expecting to make an investment. Prices range from $800 for a single cup machine, to above $5,000 for Jura’s top of the line model. You can always search for refurbished models, and Jura occasionally offers factory serviced machines that function like new, but have been returned to the company for unspecified reasons.
To that end, the MT600 will attempt to keep track of when you last dropped in a fresh charcoal pack. Just press the "filter" button on the control panel, and after six weeks an associated green light will begin blinking. If you unplug the machine, however, all bets are off, as the clock and internal filter replacement timer lose track when power is lost.
The other thing to keep in mind is that the milk frother can be a little finicky. We discussed the fact that most frothers don’t (or can’t) heat the milk to the same level as the coffee, and this machine is no different. Also, cleaning the spout can be a little tricky. Overall, when buying the E6, just plan on spending some time to get to know it. Once you’ve mastered all of the little things, it will become second nature.
And it bears out in the coffee the machine produces: our very first cup was a delicious and gloriously smooth latte with barely a hint of bitterness. The milk steaming wand is excellent too, producing much lighter, airier foam than the (admittedly way, way cheaper) Morphy Richards’ model, and there’s also a hot water spout for those who want to make an Americano by topping up their espresso.
You also get programmable push-button controls for milk, hot water and espresso outputs and given the fact that the 1003380 Accademia dispenses great beverages on demand, it’s great for those who don’t like to wait for long before their drink is ready. In total, there are 7 buttons that you can use in order to prepare one of the following drinks hot water, latte macchiato, latte, cappuccino, cafe lungo, cafe and of course, espresso.
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