Like other Jura machines, the spouts can be adjusted 2.6-4.4” to accommodate any size cup or beverage. We found the adjustable spout really handy in preventing and splashing or spillover onto the machine which limits clean up and also help create the perfect crema. We found the foam that the C65 produced to be incredibly light with almost a light, feather consistency. While the cost of this unit is slightly higher, our calculations had it paying for itself after only a few months. When we tracked the amount of coffee used and compared it to how much it would have been if purchased from a coffee shop, the Jura paid for itself quicker than you might expect. Not to mention these machines are incredibly well built and will last for years before ever needing to be repaired or serviced. And when that time does come, Jura has always been responsive and communicative which makes sending the unit in painless.

The different types of espresso machines include stove top espresso machine, pump less electric machine, manual lever pump, electronic pump, semi-automatic pump, automatic pump, super automatic pump, etc. Further, the Jura coffee machines have some interesting features. According to many Jura espresso machine reviews, Jura Ena Micro 1 is the best espresso machine by Jura. Let us delve deeper into this machine.
The Jura Giga 5 home coffee machine is fully loaded with features. It has a combined power of two professional ceramic grinders and two heating systems, enabling it to prepare specialty coffee extremely well. The two grinders are made from a wear-free ceramic and guarantees quick, accurate and consistent grinding. There are electronically controlled motors that can adjust the consistency of the grind during short grinding processes.
Like the Sage Express, Panasonic’s NC-ZA1 is a “bean to cup” espresso machine: it takes whole beans, grinds them and pushes hot water through them at pressure to produce a cup of coffee. That’s pretty much where the similarities end, however, because unlike the old-school Express, the NC-ZA1 makes almost the entire process automated – and controllable via touchscreen.
The interface is also very clean and easy to use and given the fact that it also has a function for automatic cleaning, you don’t have to worry about cleaning the machine yourself. However, probably the most notable feature (among others) of the XS90 is the fact that it features a low noise design. What I mean by that is that the burr grinder is perfectly insulated and has the lowest noise grinding of any espresso machine on the market today.
Jura is a company that well known advancing coffee technology in a way that blends convenience, sophistication, quality and most importantly easy of use into brewing coffee and espresso based beverages in the modern home. Their impressive line of Jura Coffee Makers is the true embodiment of all these values and has been impressing coffee connoisseurs over the last few years with it’s high pressure-brewed- coffee, espressos, cappuccinos and lattes.

Just by the water canister (which holds just under two litres), there’s a replaceable water filter that cleans the water as the machine begins each cycle. Depending where you live, this may carry a different weight of importance, but if you’re in an area where water has a strong taste, this may well be a big plus towards buying the Jura Impressa F8 over other machines. Water is such a big part of making coffee, it will go a long way towards giving consistent results day after day!


Hate getting up in the morning? That’ll change with the Z6. Just the thought of gazing at this handsome clean, shiny chrome machine was enough to have us leaping out of bed at 6am. Brewing coffee is fairly simple and yields powerful, yet tasty cups. Espresso based drinks are a cinch to produce too—but often taste slightly watered down. The best part is though is the nearly silent grinder, which is quiet enough to run on full power without fear of waking the whole house up. —Neil Gellar
As previously mentioned, this grinder is a bit less sturdy than its new revision, the 565. The 560 has the same issues with its mechanical timer, with the grind mechanism starting before you have had a chance to set the time. This results in a somewhat inconsistent grind quantity. The hopper lid is also not completely airtight, so it isn’t recommended that you keep your beans in it for more than a few days. The same issue with static buildup is also present, and may lead to a messy countertop.
The improvements are quite a few, including the four selectable strength options that helps determine the dosage of the shots you want to brew between five and sixteen grams of coffee. If you want, you can easily tailor your experience with programmable pre-brewing, brew temperature and water volume. You can make the adjustments by using the rotary switch and the good news is that the machine will remember your preferences so you can brew the same delicious cup of coffee next time.
For those really into their coffee drinks, and I mean obsessively so, a separate grinder is an absolute must. That loud noise you hear in the coffee shop every time you go in? That’s the grinder. Now, after saying that, let me tell you the grinder in the F7 is quiet and fast. So don’t worry about your kitchen ending up sounding like a coffee shop’s barista station.
Everything we discussed points to the Jura’s mission of making great coffee and espresso beverages at home easier. The Swiss made precision and modern design is simply an added bonus. Want your coffee freshly ground on a cup-by-cup basis? The Jura does that as a matter of course. Don’t feel like dirtying and cleaning several different pieces of equipment just to froth milk? The Jura takes care of this by warming, frothing and dispensing the milk for you. It will also clean the lines so you don’t have to word about old milk in your system. Best of all, as a consumer you can choose the coffee you want to drink while still having the convenience of single serve brewing.
Now that great espresso shots aren't hard to find, this machine is more about convenience and reliability than knock-your-socks-off espresso. But it does make great coffee - better than any Mr. Coffee or even Keurig. I keep Dark Roast Guatemalan Viennese in the bean hopper, pull two one-ounce shots, lengthen them with hot water, and I'm drinking awesome coffee before my neighbor has finished peeling the foil on his can of Maxwell House. And since I'm just buying good old whole beans, it's much cheaper to use than a Keurig.

Using the machine the first time was fun - it has lights that shine down on the cup for a very cool look. It is much quieter than our DeLonghi, and very fast to heat up and grind, brew, and dispense the coffee. The crema is very nice, and the coffee tastes great. The drip tray is easy to pull out to the front, and easy to rinse and throw away the grinds. The machine is plastic, which is ok, but the tray where the cup rests is polished silver metal, and has a nice heaviness to it. The J9.3 comes with a Jura milk container and tubes. We don't do a lot of milk drinks, so I didn't mind that you have to do just a bit extra to fill up the container and attach the hose. You could just put a hose into a cup of milk; you don't have to use the Jura container. It made a very nice latte, great foam. It was actually easy to clean and rinse, but you do have to take the time to be there with two cups - one with rinse water and another to catch the dirty water, then repeat. If you don't mind taking a couple extra steps and minutes, then it's easy. The J9.3 came with the Jura milk container.


The Jura A9 truly shines in the milk drinks department. It features 2 height adjustable spouts that go anywhere from two point two and up to five point four inches if you plan on using taller However, when it comes to the milk, the machine uses a pick-up tube system. What this means is that now you can just place the tube into the milk container and prepare delicious milk based drinks. For better results though, it’s best that you either get Jura’s cool control milk cooler or their optional thermal milk container. That’s because not only is it better to keep milk chilled for sanitary reasons, but chilled milk also produces better froth.

Super Automatic Espresso Machines are remarkable devices that provide the pinnacle of espresso machine automation. They literally do almost everything for you but drink your espresso. A super automatic espresso machine typically will grind your coffee beans, properly measure them and the water to be used, froth milk for you, and dispense a perfect beverage for you with the touch of a button. Further, they will remember your favorite recipes and customization.
The Impressa’s control panel is based around a central colour display that’s used to guide you though the process, which helps to turn a maze of functions into an intuitive set of menus (or a carousel as Jura call it). The control of the menus is achieved by a ‘rotary switch’ located on top of the machine at the front, neatly sandwiched between the power and program buttons. The buttons either side of the screen vary in purpose, depending what’s on the screen at the time. in general though, the screen splits into four zones, with each button used to select the corresponding zone.
And it bears out in the coffee the machine produces: our very first cup was a delicious and gloriously smooth latte with barely a hint of bitterness. The milk steaming wand is excellent too, producing much lighter, airier foam than the (admittedly way, way cheaper) Morphy Richards’ model, and there’s also a hot water spout for those who want to make an Americano by topping up their espresso.
The Jura E8 superautomatic espresso machine utilizes a single aluminum boiler, lined with stainless steel and featuring Thermoblock technology for rapid heating.  We prefer systems with two boilers, which allow you to simultaneously brew coffee and steam milk because single-boiler systems increase your total brewing time for milk-based drinks as the single boiler needs time to switch from one task to the other.
With the look of a shrink-rayed professional espresso machine, the grinning fizzog of shaven-headed culinary chemist Heston Blumenthal on the box and a price tag that puts it out of reach of all but the most well-heeled caffeine fiend, the Barista Express (branded as Breville in the US and Sage in the UK) is clearly aimed at those seeking a major step up in their home-brewed coffee.
Six years and 7540 shots of espresso. The only downside of this machine is that it is too easy to use so that you end up drinking more cups than you might otherwise. It's very fast to heat up, both for the main heating block, as well as for steam. The steamer wand takes some practice to get good, tight foam, but once you figure out the technique it's not difficult. The openings in the wand can clog up if you don't wipe it down right after use. I also give a short blast of steam right after that as well. After about five years we bundled it up and sent it in to the factory for cleaning and reconditioning. It came back as good as new and it's still going strong. About the only real negative aspect to the machine is that it tends to be a bit noisy, but probably no more so than someone using a fully manual pull machine and grinder.
It’s affordable (£70 at Argos at the time of writing; Dolce Gusto pods are priced at around £4 for a box of 16) and incredibly simple to set up and use. Simply fill the removable water tank with cold H2O, pop your chosen coffee pod into a slide-out drawer at the front, stick a cup under the spout and hit the power button. When it turns from red to green (a mere few seconds) the machine is ready. You then push the water lever either left (for cold drinks) or right (for hot drinks) until the desired amount of your drink is in the cup. Then slide out the drawer, expel the pod and throw it away.
With most super automatic machines, when preparing your favorite drink there is undoubtedly going to be a loss of quality in the process, but that is not the case with the PrimaDonna S Deluxe from DeLonghi. The ECAM26455M uses an integrated frothing system and the milk container in order to immediately deliver to your cup both the right amount of frothed or steamed milk and freshly brewed espresso.
Aside from the flexibility of using either the supplied gold filter or store-bought paper ones, the Capresso MT600 sports other thoughtful extras. For instance, the right side of the water tower not only features a graduated water indicator which is a staple for these type of products, but its tank fluid gauge boasts a floating red bead that makes it a cinch to see exactly where the water line is in relation to its 10 cup capacity. Frankly, it's a trick I wish other coffee makers employed.
To enable the filter and coffee machine to communicate, JURA uses modern RFID technology. Any machine fitted with the intelligent water system (I.W.S.®) recognises when a filter is inserted, automatically switches to filter mode and starts the rinsing process. When the filter capacity is nearly used up the machine prompts the user to change the filter. If the filter is not changed, the machine activates descaling mode. After a certain amount of use, the user is prompted to descale the machine. This can only be done when the filter is removed, so there is no more risk of user error resulting from misunderstandings.
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